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Introduction

You will be using many of the skills you have learned throughout the build process so far.

Next we will build the polyfuse adapter for the battery tubes. Start by removing the paper backing from both sides of the acrylic pieces.
  • Next we will build the polyfuse adapter for the battery tubes.

  • Start by removing the paper backing from both sides of the acrylic pieces.

  • Super glue one of the positive battery terminals to the acrylic piece.

  • Be sure the smaller hole is in alignment with the gap in the piece. This will ensure the polyfuse fits well.

  • When working with cyanoacrylate (super glue) it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

How many polyfuse adapters are we supposed to make? Is it 2 or 4? Dont we need 2 in each batterytube?

Tovp - Reply

There is one polyfuse in each battery tube, so a total of 2.

OpenROV -

Just one in each tube.

Zack -

Bend the leads of the polyfuse perpendicular to the fuse in opposite directions. Place the polyfuse into the gap in the acrylic piece.  The fuse leads should fit easily through the holes on each side of the adapter. Place the other button terminal on the acrylic with the lead of the polyfuse going through the small hole.
  • Bend the leads of the polyfuse perpendicular to the fuse in opposite directions.

  • Place the polyfuse into the gap in the acrylic piece. The fuse leads should fit easily through the holes on each side of the adapter.

  • Place the other button terminal on the acrylic with the lead of the polyfuse going through the small hole.

  • Make sure that the metal battery terminals aren't off center enough to keep the adapter from fitting in the battery tubes. Test fit them if you are unsure.

  • Use superglue to hold this button terminal in place.

  • Ensure that the polyfuse leads are not touching each other when packed into the gap!

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Bend the polyfuse leads onto the battery terminal and solder the terminals.  It important that the terminals lay flat and the solder is not higher than the center off the terminal which could make the battery connection intermittent. Be careful when soldering the battery terminal as it will be very hot. Repeat this process for the other battery adapter.
  • Bend the polyfuse leads onto the battery terminal and solder the terminals. It important that the terminals lay flat and the solder is not higher than the center off the terminal which could make the battery connection intermittent.

  • Be careful when soldering the battery terminal as it will be very hot.

  • Repeat this process for the other battery adapter.

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Sand down the top of the base of the spring terminal. Do a corner that is adjacent to the smaller of the holes. Solder on a glob of solder on the sanded portion of the spring terminal.
  • Sand down the top of the base of the spring terminal. Do a corner that is adjacent to the smaller of the holes.

  • Solder on a glob of solder on the sanded portion of the spring terminal.

  • Do this for both battery terminals.

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Place the internal structure into the shell. This is for measurement and alignment purposes for the following steps.  Do not place your shell permanently onto the motor structure just yet.
  • Place the internal structure into the shell.

  • This is for measurement and alignment purposes for the following steps. Do not place your shell permanently onto the motor structure just yet.

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Align the round irregular shaped piece with the holes in the square piece. Cement together and set aside, the rest will not be cemented until the battery wires are routed.
  • Align the round irregular shaped piece with the holes in the square piece.

  • Cement together and set aside, the rest will not be cemented until the battery wires are routed.

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

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Grab your end cap piece and slide the starboard side wires through the hole. Make sure you slide the piece on the wires, square piece first. Slide the acrylic piece on with the wires going through the holes.
  • Grab your end cap piece and slide the starboard side wires through the hole. Make sure you slide the piece on the wires, square piece first.

  • Slide the acrylic piece on with the wires going through the holes.

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Make sure your end cap is flushed against the shell and is next to the slit marked in image 1. Pull any slack from behind the end cap so it's a comfortable length without it being too taut. Also make sure the acrylic is oriented as shown in image 1 with wires coming from bottom. Hold that end cap piece at its designated length and drag along the circular pieces to it. Make sure it is concentric.
  • Make sure your end cap is flushed against the shell and is next to the slit marked in image 1. Pull any slack from behind the end cap so it's a comfortable length without it being too taut.

  • Also make sure the acrylic is oriented as shown in image 1 with wires coming from bottom.

  • Hold that end cap piece at its designated length and drag along the circular pieces to it. Make sure it is concentric.

  • Acrylic cement the pieces together.

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Clip the negative wire around 1cm away from the acrylic piece. Strip the negative wires.
  • Clip the negative wire around 1cm away from the acrylic piece.

  • Strip the negative wires.

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Slide on the spring terminal, with green wire through the larger hole. Thread the spring terminal all the way to the acrylic pieces, threading the negative wire through the smaller hole. Bend the wires over the glob and solder it on.
  • Slide on the spring terminal, with green wire through the larger hole.

  • Thread the spring terminal all the way to the acrylic pieces, threading the negative wire through the smaller hole.

  • Bend the wires over the glob and solder it on.

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Grab one of your battery tubes and put an endcap on one end with the green wire going through. Seal the end caps by cementing around the edge. If the fit is tight, you can use sandpaper to sand the inside edge of the battery tube to bevel it (just like you did for the main electronics tube).
  • Grab one of your battery tubes and put an endcap on one end with the green wire going through.

  • Seal the end caps by cementing around the edge.

  • If the fit is tight, you can use sandpaper to sand the inside edge of the battery tube to bevel it (just like you did for the main electronics tube).

  • Do the same steps for the port side battery tube.

It might make sense to deburr the inside of the battery tube with sandpaper where it's attached to the glued-on end cap. The tolerances are very tight and it is a bit of a challenge to slide the tube over the endcap.

Chris McCann - Reply

Chris - Thank you for the great suggestion. I have added that to the build guide. Please let us know if there are any other build tips that you have! - Brian G.

OpenROV -

The positive wire on the orange tube is going to end up really short. You have to extend it before you put the tube on that side. I added the remaining green from the other side to it, and heat shrunk it, but now the batteries are hard to put in and remove (not actually sure I'm going to be able to get them out right now).

I'm not sure what the best option would be...possibly adding to it on near the back.

Ryan - Reply

Hi There!

Like Ryan, my orange wire is way to short.

But there really isn't enough tolerance on the length of the wire.

I also added some spare wire to extend it.. soldering and heat shrinking the joint.

Unfortunately the joint is fractionally to thick to allow the batteries to fit freely.. you have to force them.. then guess what.. you can't get them out.. and you can't get the correct tension on the negative spring loaded terminal.

Also by this point you have cemented this end cap shut.. so you can't get access from the other end either to rectify the issue.

Why not just have rubber bungs fitted on this end and allow them to be removable.. or at least delay the cementing of the joint until you have tested for the fit of the batteries.

I'm now racking my brains about how to extract the batteries and how I am going to be able to modify the swollen solder joint.

Like Ryan said.. if it was closed to the terminal it would be fine I think..

Any Ideas?? :)

bounceyball - Reply

Hi again all..

A solution:

1. Cut the orange black wires at the loom end (allowing sufficient wire lengths to resolder and insulate later.

2. Shake the tube up and down like a teenager discovering the internet for the first time!

3. Eventually you will get the right wrist action and hopefully release one of the batteries (Like trying to shake tomato sauce from a newly opened bottle).

4. Carefully poke a thin coat hanger with a small L shape bent on the end of it (taking care not to score the tube excessively) passed the remaining battery and hook it out carefully (avoiding damaging the battery terminal.)

5. Resolder an additional length of wire to existing wire (don't use any insulation sleeving).

6. Using a long screwdriver, Poke the offending heat shrunk joint all the way down to the spring terminals, coiling it out of the way of the terminals.

7. Cut the new extended wire to the correct length and resolder terminals etc (Test for ease of battery fit)

Hope this helps!! :)

bounceyball -

I ended up prying my batteries out, then using an xacto knife to cut the heat shrink off the wire inside the tube. Now the batteries will go in and out no problem. However, it leaves me with a bare connection inside the tube. So far this hasn't been an issue, but it remains to be seen...

Ryan -

Hi friends, I'm stuck in this step. The orange wire is really short, but thanks to Ryan and bounceyball, I 've stopped at this point. What is the best way to follow ? extending the wire into the battery tube or joining a wire length before the ends caps ? THanks . Marco

neuquensub - Reply

Hey guys,

Yeah, this step is really tricky if the wire routing makes the orange wire short.

You're on the right track for a solution though. I always prefer to extend the length of wire in the front by soldering on a new length (roughly 4 cm or so). The wire should be loose so that it can spiral down the battery tube on the outside of the batteries.

It's annoying, but it will be effective. As for removing the batteries, I usually use electrical tape to stick all three batteries together once they are charged if I have a tube I know is sticky or batteries that don't make the best contact with each other.

Best,

~Z

Zack -

Sand one of the corners of the top of the button terminal. On the topside of the terminal, solder a glob on the corner you sanded earlier.
  • Sand one of the corners of the top of the button terminal.

  • On the topside of the terminal, solder a glob on the corner you sanded earlier.

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Apply two drops of super glue on opposite corners. This is important for making the potting step easier. Then place the button terminal on the front end cap.
  • Apply two drops of super glue on opposite corners. This is important for making the potting step easier.

  • Then place the button terminal on the front end cap.

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Next, prepare the frame and battery tubes for epoxy. Hang the battery tubes over a table edge and with your Tenda box, place the end cap on top of it as shown.
  • Next, prepare the frame and battery tubes for epoxy. Hang the battery tubes over a table edge and with your Tenda box, place the end cap on top of it as shown.

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Begin epoxying the end caps, make sure the epoxy flows through the entire end cap where it is slightly oozing up the wires.
  • Begin epoxying the end caps, make sure the epoxy flows through the entire end cap where it is slightly oozing up the wires.

  • When working with epoxy it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

  • Allow the epoxy to cure for 4-6 hours before working with it again. Allow the epoxy to cure for 24 hours before using your OpenROV in water.

I am watching the epoxy dripping down the insides of the battery tubes. You need super glue the spring terminals during step 10, or there is nothing to stop the epoxy from flowing down into the tubes.

Now trying to keep the wires from getting fixed to the sides of the tubes. Not sure How to clean this out....

paultompkins - Reply

Next, we'll also fill the back side of the main endcaps around the protruding parts of the syringe sections.
  • Next, we'll also fill the back side of the main endcaps around the protruding parts of the syringe sections.

  • Be careful not to allow epoxy to over-flow into the hole of the syringe as this will need to be clear for the syringe plunger (which acts as a pressure relief valve).

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Epoxy the other endcap at this time as well.
  • Epoxy the other endcap at this time as well.

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Apply epoxy to both front battery end caps till it fills the concave space of the button terminal.
  • Apply epoxy to both front battery end caps till it fills the concave space of the button terminal.

  • If the epoxy is shooting back up on you it's because there is no where for the air to escape because too much super glue was applied when gluing the terminal to the front end cap. Use a tooth pick to push the epoxy in and allow air to escape the enclosed space.

  • Allow the epoxy to cure for 4-6 hours.

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Continue your build by progressing to Guide 6.
  • Continue your build by progressing to Guide 6.

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Finish Line

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