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Guide 3 - Electronics

We will now move to the assembly of the electronics that will control the ROV.

  • Author: OpenROV
  • Time estimate: 2 hours
  • Difficulty: Moderate

We will introduce soldering in this guide.

Edit Step 1 Camera Mount Acrylic Structure  ¶ 

Image 1/3: We will start by building the camera platform. Image 2/3: You will need five parts for this step. Image 3/3: Start by removing the paper backing from the pieces.

Edit Step 1 Camera Mount Acrylic Structure  ¶ 

  • We are now going to build the electronics chassis for the ROV.

  • We will start by building the camera platform.

  • You will need five parts for this step.

  • Start by removing the paper backing from the pieces.

  • Cement the outer camera hinge to the outside of the camera mount. Use care to get the hinge perfectly perpendicular to the mount, as it will need to move freely within the housing.

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 2  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Do the same for the other side. Make sure they both end up on the same side of the camera mount. Image 2/2: You have completed the acrylic structure for the camera to mount onto.

Edit Step 2  ¶ 

  • Attach the smaller arm ( the servo arm holder) to the main arm and ensure it is flush with the camera platform (the largest piece).

  • Do the same for the other side. Make sure they both end up on the same side of the camera mount.

  • You have completed the acrylic structure for the camera to mount onto.

Edit Step 3  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Make sure you have all the parts and then peel the paper backing off from both sides. Image 2/2: Place two of the nylon screws (from the hardware bag) in the piece as shown. This will help keep the next piece aligned.

Edit Step 3  ¶ 

  • We will now build the electronics chassis.

  • Make sure you have all the parts and then peel the paper backing off from both sides.

  • Place two of the nylon screws (from the hardware bag) in the piece as shown. This will help keep the next piece aligned.

2 Edit Step 4  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Once the pieces are aligned, place 2 nylon screws on opposite corners, then cement the acrylic pieces together. Image 2/3: DO NOT CEMENT THE SCREWS IN PLACE! They are only meant to help align the two pieces correctly. Once cemented slightly, you may remove the screws and cement the rest of the piece. Image 3/3: DO NOT CEMENT THE SCREWS IN PLACE! They are only meant to help align the two pieces correctly. Once cemented slightly, you may remove the screws and cement the rest of the piece.

2 Edit Step 4  ¶ 

  • Double check that your orientation is correct. It is possible to build this part backwards. Thick acrylic piece on top of thin acrylic piece. Make sure your parts match the picture.

  • Once the pieces are aligned, place 2 nylon screws on opposite corners, then cement the acrylic pieces together.

  • DO NOT CEMENT THE SCREWS IN PLACE! They are only meant to help align the two pieces correctly. Once cemented slightly, you may remove the screws and cement the rest of the piece.

Edit Step 5  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 5  ¶ 

  • Next, we will mount the long acrylic piece. This is attached to the side of the two pieces that you just cemented together.

Edit Step 6  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:

Edit Step 6  ¶ 

  • Attach the semi-circular pieces to both sides of the structure in the alignment shown.

Edit Step 7  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:

Edit Step 7  ¶ 

  • Cement the small acrylic piece onto the front of the chassis. This will hold the servo in place.

Edit Step 8 Topside Tenda Adapter  ¶ 

Image 1/3: This box will be made from two assemblies. Image 2/3: Start by laying out pieces as show in image 1. Image 3/3: Take off the backing '''ONLY''' from the sides facing up.

Edit Step 8 Topside Tenda Adapter  ¶ 

  • We are now going to build the topside electronics box.

  • This box will be made from two assemblies.

  • Start by laying out pieces as show in image 1.

  • Take off the backing ONLY from the sides facing up.

  • When put together, the inside faces should have the backing off while the outside faces have the backing on.

Edit Step 9  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:

Edit Step 9  ¶ 

  • Acrylic cement the pieces together.

Edit Step 10  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Build the second half of the adapter box much like the first. Lay out the pieces as show in image 1. Image 2/3: Take off the backing only on the sides facing up. Image 3/3: Assemble as shown in image 3 and acrylic cement.

Edit Step 10  ¶ 

  • We will now construct the other side of the box.

  • Build the second half of the adapter box much like the first. Lay out the pieces as show in image 1.

  • Take off the backing only on the sides facing up.

  • Assemble as shown in image 3 and acrylic cement.

Edit Step 11  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Leave these pieces separate. Image 2/2: Leave these pieces separate.

Edit Step 11  ¶ 

  • Peel off backing from outside faces.

  • Leave these pieces separate.

Edit Step 12  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Using a flat-tip screw driver, gently twist the tip to crack open the plastic lid from the adapter. Use this as a hinge to open the plastic box, and remove the lid. Image 2/3: Be careful so you do not stab yourself with the screwdriver. Image 3/3: With care, remove the top circuit board (power supply) from the adapter housing. The small circuit board with the LAN input (the bottom one) is the one you want.  It should be removed easily at this point.

Edit Step 12  ¶ 

  • Remove the 2 Tenda Homeplug Adapters from their box. DO NOT toss the box or the 2 ethernet wires. They will be needed in future guides. Put aside for now.

  • Using a flat-tip screw driver, gently twist the tip to crack open the plastic lid from the adapter. Use this as a hinge to open the plastic box, and remove the lid.

  • Be careful so you do not stab yourself with the screwdriver.

  • With care, remove the top circuit board (power supply) from the adapter housing. The small circuit board with the LAN input (the bottom one) is the one you want. It should be removed easily at this point.

  • Do the same with the other tenda. When finished you should have two identical circuit boards. Hardware hacking!

Edit Step 13  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Line up both headers. Image 2/3: Press firmly into place. Image 3/3: Press firmly into place.

Edit Step 13  ¶ 

  • We will now mount one of the homeplug adapter boards to the the topside electronics board.

  • Line up both headers.

  • Press firmly into place.

Edit Step 14  ¶ 

Image 1/3: You may have to angle your board in order to have the LAN connection fit in correctly. Image 2/3: Attach the second piece of the box to close it up. Once closed, use tape to keep the box held together. Image 3/3: When taping the box closed make sure not to cover the LED indicator lights.

Edit Step 14  ¶ 

  • Place the completed topside electronics into the acrylic topside box half.

  • You may have to angle your board in order to have the LAN connection fit in correctly.

  • Attach the second piece of the box to close it up. Once closed, use tape to keep the box held together.

  • When taping the box closed make sure not to cover the LED indicator lights.

  • The reason we are not cementing the box closed is so you can get to the electronics later if there is a problem.

2 Edit Step 15 Soldering Tutorial  ¶ 

Image 1/3: If you have a soldering iron with variable temperatures, it is a good idea to adjust the temperature for what is being soldered.  Any soldering that is done in close proximity to solid state components should be done at a temperature below 600 degrees.  Other wiring (motors, other hardware) can use a higher temperature. Image 2/3: There are various thicknesses of solder that can be used for the appropriate solder joint.  A thinner solder wire is used for soldering smaller components. Image 3/3: Solder iron tips come in various sizes and texture.  For the OpenROV a small tip with a straight edge at the end is recommended.  This will allow you to solder smaller joints, while giving the tip some stability when heating the solder pads on the circuits.

2 Edit Step 15 Soldering Tutorial  ¶ 

  • Use caution when soldering electronic components. The temperatures are 500 degrees and higher. Eye protection is required.

  • If you have a soldering iron with variable temperatures, it is a good idea to adjust the temperature for what is being soldered. Any soldering that is done in close proximity to solid state components should be done at a temperature below 600 degrees. Other wiring (motors, other hardware) can use a higher temperature.

  • There are various thicknesses of solder that can be used for the appropriate solder joint. A thinner solder wire is used for soldering smaller components.

  • Solder iron tips come in various sizes and texture. For the OpenROV a small tip with a straight edge at the end is recommended. This will allow you to solder smaller joints, while giving the tip some stability when heating the solder pads on the circuits.

  • You should heat the solder joint with the iron for approximately 5-10 seconds before putting any solder on the joint. The solder should run freely between the iron, the wire, and the solder pad. Once the right amount of solder is applied you should be able to remove the iron and see a nice shiny connection between the wire, and the solder pad.

  • If there are holes, major discoloration, or giant globs of solder everywhere, your connection between the wire and the solder pad may not take place and your electronics may not work properly.

  • Video (How to Solder Electronics)

  • How to Use a Soldering Iron: A Beginner’s Guide by How to Geek.

Edit Step 16 Soldering The Light Board  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Start by stripping one side of the two pieces of red wire length and two pieces of black wire length. Image 2/2: Tin the wires with a soldering iron.

Edit Step 16 Soldering The Light Board  ¶ 

  • The first thing you will solder are the leads from the light circuit board.

  • Start by stripping one side of the two pieces of red wire length and two pieces of black wire length.

  • Tin the wires with a soldering iron.

  • Tinning is an important skill, if you are unsure or unpracticed at it, refer to this great Instructable.

  • Insert the wires into the two holes labeled "LEDS."

  • Power (red wire) and ground (black wire) is labeled on the back of the board.

Edit Step 17  ¶ 

Image 1/3: It is very important not to get solder between the two wires or between the two pads (silver areas where the wires enter the board). This may cause an electrical short. Image 2/3: If available use a small soldering tip and very little solder. Image 3/3: Also it can help to place the soldering iron on the outside of the wires rather than between the two.

Edit Step 17  ¶ 

  • Use a soldering iron to heat the wire and apply solder.

    • It is very important not to get solder between the two wires or between the two pads (silver areas where the wires enter the board). This may cause an electrical short.

    • If available use a small soldering tip and very little solder.

    • Also it can help to place the soldering iron on the outside of the wires rather than between the two.

    • Here's an example of where not to put the soldering iron.

Edit Step 18  ¶ 

Image 1/2: This is an example of a '''bad ''' solder connection. There is a bridge between the solder joints that will cause an electrical short. Image 2/2: This is an example of a '''bad ''' solder connection. There is a bridge between the solder joints that will cause an electrical short.

Edit Step 18  ¶ 

  • This is an example of a good solder connection.

  • This is an example of a bad solder connection. There is a bridge between the solder joints that will cause an electrical short.

Edit Step 19  ¶ 

Image 1/1: Repeat this with the other red and black wires into the two holes labeled "LASERS."

Edit Step 19  ¶ 

  • Use flush cutters to remove the extra wire from the front.

  • Repeat this with the other red and black wires into the two holes labeled "LASERS."

Edit Step 20 Solder Lasers to the Light Board  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Attach lasers to the labeled solder pads "Laser Diode." The red wire is positive and the blue one is negative. Image 2/3: Solder these onto the board from the front. Use minimal solder and minimal heat for these connections. Image 3/3: Be very careful to not create a solder bridge between the two connections, as this will cause an electrical short.

Edit Step 20 Solder Lasers to the Light Board  ¶ 

  • Next, take two laser diodes (the third one in your kit is a spare) and strip 1/4" (6 mm) from each lead.

  • Attach lasers to the labeled solder pads "Laser Diode." The red wire is positive and the blue one is negative.

  • Solder these onto the board from the front. Use minimal solder and minimal heat for these connections.

  • Be very careful to not create a solder bridge between the two connections, as this will cause an electrical short.

  • Use diagonal cutters to cut of extra wire and solder.

1 Edit Step 21  ¶ 

Image 1/1: To do this set your multimeter to continuity. If this is your first time running a continuity test, [http://www.ladyada.net/library/metertut/continuity.html|refer to this amazing guide by ladyada.net|new_window=true].

1 Edit Step 21  ¶ 

  • Because it is easy to create a short at this step, it is important to check each soldered pair of wires with a digital multimeter.

  • To do this set your multimeter to continuity. If this is your first time running a continuity test, refer to this amazing guide by ladyada.net.

  • If you detect any shorts, try to fix them by brushing a hot soldering iron between the connectors.

  • If this doesn't work, you can also try using a solder sucker or solder wick to remove the solder.

Edit Step 22  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 22  ¶ 

  • If all the connections are good, you should have a completed light board and are ready for the next steps.

Edit Step 23 Camera Preparation  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Take the camera out of its box. Detach the base from the camera by pulling it off (a hard tug will do the trick). Image 2/3: Remove the bottom swivel from the camera with a phillips head screwdriver. Unscrew the pin and push the crew out (the hex wrench works well). Image 3/3: Remove the bottom swivel from the camera with a phillips head screwdriver. Unscrew the pin and push the crew out (the hex wrench works well).

Edit Step 23 Camera Preparation  ¶ 

  • We will now prepare the camera to be mounted.

  • Take the camera out of its box. Detach the base from the camera by pulling it off (a hard tug will do the trick).

  • Remove the bottom swivel from the camera with a phillips head screwdriver. Unscrew the pin and push the crew out (the hex wrench works well).

Edit Step 24  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Remove the silver ring around the camera lens by using a flat head screw driver.  It should pop off easily. Image 2/2: You will still be able to focus the camera later.

Edit Step 24  ¶ 

  • Clean up the wires by cutting off the tag, and the velcro strap. Make sure not to cut the wire.

  • Remove the silver ring around the camera lens by using a flat head screw driver. It should pop off easily.

  • You will still be able to focus the camera later.

Edit Step 25 Camera Blinders  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Place a section of the 1/4" black sleeve against the light board and cut 1cm above the top of the light board. Do this twice so you have two pieces. Image 2/3: Use the heat gun to melt the ends of the pieces to prevent fraying of the sleeve. Image 3/3: Use the heat gun to melt the ends of the pieces to prevent fraying of the sleeve.

Edit Step 25 Camera Blinders  ¶ 

  • Next, we will make the blinders that keep the light from overpowering the camera.

  • Place a section of the 1/4" black sleeve against the light board and cut 1cm above the top of the light board. Do this twice so you have two pieces.

  • Use the heat gun to melt the ends of the pieces to prevent fraying of the sleeve.

Edit Step 26  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Confirm that the laser holes and camera bottom are on the same side. Image 2/2: Place the light board on the front of the acrylic piece. Have the soldered wires be on the bottom of the acrylic piece.

Edit Step 26  ¶ 

  • Place the acrylic camera mount that you made earlier on the webcam. Make sure the acrylic and webcam are both oriented as shown.

  • Confirm that the laser holes and camera bottom are on the same side.

  • Place the light board on the front of the acrylic piece. Have the soldered wires be on the bottom of the acrylic piece.

Edit Step 27  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 27  ¶ 

  • Grab two of the smaller zip ties and place the cut 1/4" black sleeve over them as shown.

Edit Step 28 Attaching the Camera  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Grab the zip-ties with the sleeves and attach them with the sleeve on the front of the light board. The connection of the zip-tie should be at the top of the camera. Image 2/3: Cut off the excess zip tie with a diagonal cutter. Image 3/3: Cut off the excess zip tie with a diagonal cutter.

Edit Step 28 Attaching the Camera  ¶ 

  • Route the camera wire under one of the zip-ties. It does not matter which direction the wire goes.

  • Grab the zip-ties with the sleeves and attach them with the sleeve on the front of the light board. The connection of the zip-tie should be at the top of the camera.

  • Cut off the excess zip tie with a diagonal cutter.

1 Edit Step 29 Attaching the Tenda Adapter to the Controller Board  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Insert the RJ-45 ethernet (LAN) Jumper into the Tenda adapter board. Image 2/3: Place the Tenda board onto the ROV controller board.  There are two 6 pin connectors that were designed to accept the tenda.  Push the board onto the pins and ensure it makes a straight connection. Image 3/3: The other end of the ethernet jumper will be plugged into the Beagle Bone Black.

1 Edit Step 29 Attaching the Tenda Adapter to the Controller Board  ¶ 

  • Next, we are going to work on the remaining electronics.

  • Insert the RJ-45 ethernet (LAN) Jumper into the Tenda adapter board.

  • Place the Tenda board onto the ROV controller board. There are two 6 pin connectors that were designed to accept the tenda. Push the board onto the pins and ensure it makes a straight connection.

  • The other end of the ethernet jumper will be plugged into the Beagle Bone Black.

Edit Step 30  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 30  ¶ 

  • Remove BeagleBone Black from its box. Keep the USB wire it comes with as well as the desiccant.

4 Edit Step 31 Attaching the Beagle Bone to Controller Board  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Thread the standoff onto the screw. Image 2/3: Remove your BeagleBone Black (BBB) from the box and attach the other end of the Ethernet jumper to your BBB. '''Keep the USB wire that comes in the box. '''You will need this to operate the ROV. Image 3/3: Press the BeagleBone Black onto the extended header set on the Controller Board as shown. Make sure the header pins on each board are aligned with each-other properly!

4 Edit Step 31 Attaching the Beagle Bone to Controller Board  ¶ 

  • Place an 8mm nylon M3 screw through the hole on the electronics board.

  • Thread the standoff onto the screw.

  • Remove your BeagleBone Black (BBB) from the box and attach the other end of the Ethernet jumper to your BBB. Keep the USB wire that comes in the box. You will need this to operate the ROV.

  • Press the BeagleBone Black onto the extended header set on the Controller Board as shown. Make sure the header pins on each board are aligned with each-other properly!

  • Secure the BeagleBone Black to the nylon standoff using an additional nylon M3 screw.

Edit Step 32 Attaching ESC's and Servos  ¶ 

Image 1/2: You should now have a completed controller board! Image 2/2: You should now have a completed controller board!

Edit Step 32 Attaching ESC's and Servos  ¶ 

  • Tuck ESC wires under BeagleBone Black for wire management.

  • You should now have a completed controller board!

Edit Step 33 Assembling the E-Chassis Components  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Have the camera mount be oriented with laser sockets as shown in image 1. Image 2/3: Place onto rear chassis with the two square holes at the top. Image 3/3: With your 8mm M3 nylon screw and nut, attach the camera mount onto the controller board acrylic. Make sure to screw on the nut snugly to allow the camera mount to rotate up and down without much resistance.

Edit Step 33 Assembling the E-Chassis Components  ¶ 

  • We will now combine the front and rear electronics chassis.

  • Have the camera mount be oriented with laser sockets as shown in image 1.

  • Place onto rear chassis with the two square holes at the top.

  • With your 8mm M3 nylon screw and nut, attach the camera mount onto the controller board acrylic. Make sure to screw on the nut snugly to allow the camera mount to rotate up and down without much resistance.

  • Use pliers to hold the nut in place while using a flat head to screw in the nylon piece.

  • There is a screw and nut on both sides.

Edit Step 34  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Start by using a screw driver to remove the round white servo horn on the servo. Image 2/3: Take the two-arm servo control horn (in the same box as the HS-81 servo) and cut off one of its arms using a diagonal cutter. Image 3/3: Also use the diagonal cutter to remove the corners from the cut-off portion of the horn. This will allow the arm to fit inside the hole cut out in the Camera Mount arm.

Edit Step 34  ¶ 

  • We will now modify the servo horn.

  • Start by using a screw driver to remove the round white servo horn on the servo.

  • Take the two-arm servo control horn (in the same box as the HS-81 servo) and cut off one of its arms using a diagonal cutter.

  • Also use the diagonal cutter to remove the corners from the cut-off portion of the horn. This will allow the arm to fit inside the hole cut out in the Camera Mount arm.

  • Wear eye protection when cutting the servo horn.

  • Install the modified arm on the servo.

1 Edit Step 35  ¶ 

Image 1/1: To do this '''gently''' rotate it back and forth to its extreme left and extreme right.  You can remove the horn and then adjust how the horn is placed on the servo so that it centered between the extremes.  (see diagram).

1 Edit Step 35  ¶ 

  • Before mounting the servo to the E-Chassis, make sure the horn (white plastic part) is centered.

  • To do this gently rotate it back and forth to its extreme left and extreme right. You can remove the horn and then adjust how the horn is placed on the servo so that it centered between the extremes. (see diagram).

Edit Step 36 Attaching Servo  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Make sure you have the servo arm slide into the camera mount arm. Image 2/3: Use electrical tape to keep the servo in place. Image 3/3: Use electrical tape to keep the servo in place.

Edit Step 36 Attaching Servo  ¶ 

  • Place servo into the board on opposite side of the camera mount.

  • Make sure you have the servo arm slide into the camera mount arm.

  • Use electrical tape to keep the servo in place.

Edit Step 37 Light Board and Camera Wires  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 37 Light Board and Camera Wires  ¶ 

  • Thread the light board wires (4 in total) and USB cable through the center hole. Do not pull the camera USB cable all the way through.

Edit Step 38  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 38  ¶ 

  • Plug in the USB cable to the BeagleBone Black.

Edit Step 39 Attaching the Controller Board to the Acrylic Chassis  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Once the wires are pushed there, place the controller board on top. Pull the USB cable on the other end to provide minimal wire slack. Image 2/2: For wire management purposes, have the USB wire wrap around the DB-25 plug.

Edit Step 39 Attaching the Controller Board to the Acrylic Chassis  ¶ 

  • Bundle the wires that are threaded through the center and the servo wires towards the area where there is a gap in the acrylic as indicated in image 1.

  • Once the wires are pushed there, place the controller board on top. Pull the USB cable on the other end to provide minimal wire slack.

  • For wire management purposes, have the USB wire wrap around the DB-25 plug.

Edit Step 40 Attaching the Controller Board to the Acrylic Chassis  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Attach to 4 designated corners. Image 2/3: Don't over-tighten the screws. The controller board should be flat (top of image 3). Over-tightening the screws can cause the controller board to bend, which may cause solder joints to break (bottom of image 3). Image 3/3: Don't over-tighten the screws. The controller board should be flat (top of image 3). Over-tightening the screws can cause the controller board to bend, which may cause solder joints to break (bottom of image 3).

Edit Step 40 Attaching the Controller Board to the Acrylic Chassis  ¶ 

  • With the 16mm M3 nylon screws and nuts, begin securing the board onto the acrylic.

  • Attach to 4 designated corners.

  • Don't over-tighten the screws. The controller board should be flat (top of image 3). Over-tightening the screws can cause the controller board to bend, which may cause solder joints to break (bottom of image 3).

Edit Step 41 Getting Voltage to the Light Board  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Plug in LED and laser wires to their designated pins. LEDs go to P1 on the and lasers go to P2. Image 2/2: Plug in LED and laser wires to their designated pins. LEDs go to P1 on the and lasers go to P2.

Edit Step 41 Getting Voltage to the Light Board  ¶ 

  • See which ground and power wires go to which side of the controller board. Port side is Lasers and Starboard side is LEDs

  • Plug in LED and laser wires to their designated pins. LEDs go to P1 on the and lasers go to P2.

Edit Step 42  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 42  ¶ 

  • Attach servo wires to designated pins on the other side of the board D11. Make sure black wire is oriented to the outside.

Edit Step 43  ¶ 

Image 1/3: With the excess webcam wire, you will begin tucking it inside the E-Chassis. Push the wire inside the hole till it pushes against the outer edges. Image 2/3: You want to make sure you push as far out as possible to have as much room to fit the entire wire length inside. Image 3/3: Using the hex wrench helps a lot to push the wires farther out.

Edit Step 43  ¶ 

  • Using clear acrylic for visual clarity for this step.

  • With the excess webcam wire, you will begin tucking it inside the E-Chassis. Push the wire inside the hole till it pushes against the outer edges.

  • You want to make sure you push as far out as possible to have as much room to fit the entire wire length inside.

  • Using the hex wrench helps a lot to push the wires farther out.

Edit Step 44  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:

Edit Step 44  ¶ 

  • Once tucked in, test your camera mount moving back and forth. Preferably there should be no force pulling the camera when at its extremes

Edit Step 45 You Are Now a Robot Technician!  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:

Edit Step 45 You Are Now a Robot Technician!  ¶ 

  • Congratulations! You have completed the construction of the E-Chassis!

Edit Step 46  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 46  ¶ 

  • Continue your build by progressing to Guide 4.

You're Done!

13 Comments

This is so fun, though quite a challenge for my 63 year old eyes! One minor suggestion. I infer between steps 34-35 that I need to remove the round nylon flange from the servo and replace it with the modified horn. But, you never say it. This could be made more clear.

Jerry Fiddler - Reply

Jerry - We are so glad to hear that you are having fun building your ROV! Comments like yours bring smiles to the faces of everyone at the office. Thank you for the suggestion and I have added that step to the directions. We encourage user feedback on the directions and product as a whole. Please continue to post about issues that you run into. -Brian G.

OpenROV -

This step says "place two nylon screws" as the previous step did. I presume it means add two nylon nuts? To hold the screws loosely in place? Otherwise they drop out when you pick it up.

Chris Thompson - Reply

Actually, putting the screws in from the top was a better solution.

Chris Thompson - Reply

Hi, it is no big deal. Numerous Good videos and instructions are available online. But wanted to point out that the video link does not work in certain countries. Norway for example.

sankar subramanian - Reply

Thanks for the comment about the video link. We will find a different one to use. -Brian G.

OpenROV -

Does the continuity check with the multimeter in Step 21 apply to the lasers as well?

I show a good circuit for the LEDS (note you have to hold the loose wires together to complete the circuit), but for the Laser solder points I'm not showing this.

Kevin - Reply

While I haven't gotten to any gluing yet as my glue has not arrived I have been working through the guides finding sections I can work on. This step so far has been the most difficult as the RJ-45 ethernet (LAN) Jumper connected to the Tenda adapter board is a tight squeeze in between the wires for the ESCs when connecting the Tenda to the control board, not sure if there a way to route the ESC wires that would steer clear of the area the RJ-45 connection sits.

Chan Valentine - Reply

I see in the photo of the step 31 where the wires that coming from ESC1, ESC2 , ESC 3 are unhooked. I can't find instruction for interconnect its to controller board. In my controller board the ESC1 is connected to D6 servo output. The ESC2 is connected to D7 servo output and the ESC3 is connected to D8 servo output. Is right? Thanks!

stefano - Reply

Hey Stefano,

The picture does show them unhooked, but they should arrive connected when you order one. In case they aren't the ESCs are connected in this order: far right d6, middle d7, far left d8 when looking at the board with the DB-25 connector at the top and facing you. Servo attaches to d11.

Thanks,

~Z

Zack -

Hi Zack, thank you. Are you sure? Because I receive the three Esc connected to the controller board, but don't like you tell.The connection that I find in my controller board is: ESC1 is connected to D6 servo output.

ESC2 is connected to D7 servo output

ESC3 is connected to D8 servo output

Please help me, thanks

stefano - Reply

Both Zack and Stafano are correct:

If you are looking at the controller board with the DB-25 connector at the top

ESC1 (far right) is connected to D6 servo output.

ESC2 (middle ESC) is connected to D7 servo output

ESC3 (far left) is connected to D8 servo output

OpenROV -

Make sure this step is followed to the word. I finished everything all the way to step 44 and realized the camera would not rotate in one direction because the servo is already at one extreme. I had to unplug and unscrew everything to sort out the problem and repeat the steps 33 through to 44.

sankar subramanian - Reply

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