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How to Assemble OpenROV 2.6

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Edit Step 1 How to Assemble OpenROV 2.6  ¶ 

Image 1/3: To build the ROV, you'll need the parts shown (which are all included in the v2.6 kit).  If you're starting from scratch, you'll want to consult our [https://docs.google.com/a/openrov.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Avf6fUwp9B3kdF9YQWxBTnZjZEVGZVQwY25EbnVyREE&usp=drive_web#gid=2|Bill of Materials] before getting started. Image 2/3: If you have an ROV with a serial number of 1200 or higher your kit also includes the battery adapters that are shown in the second picture. If your ROV has a serial number of 1400 or higher you have a battery adapter as well as there are a few different parts, shown in the third picture. Check out this [http://openrov.com/profiles/blogs/announcements-official-changes-to-openrov-2-6|blog] post to learn more about the changes. Image 3/3: '''Tools you will need (not included in kit):'''

Edit Step 1 How to Assemble OpenROV 2.6  ¶ 

  • This instruction set, for OpenROV v2.6, is a work in progress. We have posted the photos taken so far to help people with kits get a general idea of how things go together. Please post questions about the build on the OpenROV Forums.

  • To build the ROV, you'll need the parts shown (which are all included in the v2.6 kit). If you're starting from scratch, you'll want to consult our Bill of Materials before getting started.

  • If you have an ROV with a serial number of 1200 or higher your kit also includes the battery adapters that are shown in the second picture. If your ROV has a serial number of 1400 or higher you have a battery adapter as well as there are a few different parts, shown in the third picture. Check out this blog post to learn more about the changes.

  • Tools you will need (not included in kit):

  • Glues/solvents/lubricants: Devcon "Flow Mix" 2-Ton Epoxy (two 14mL syringes should do it), Acrylic Cement and Hypo Applicator(BD-25), super glue, hot glue gun and sticks, silicone spray or jelly for lubricating o-rings and protecting motors

  • Electronics/wiring tools: Soldering iron, solder, helping hands, safety glasses (recommended), wire strippers, flush cutters, heat gun, electrical tape, and a digital mulitmeter

  • Hand tools: Sandpaper, small hacksaw or pipesaw, small set of screwdrivers, tape measure with metric markings, needlenose pliers, wrench, and painter's or masking tape

  • Educators: Use the Team Build Flowchart to manage multiple students working on a single OpenROV.

Edit Step 2  ¶ 

Image 1/2: OpenROV 2.6 is designed so that many different "c-cell" sized rechargeable batters can be used. Image 2/2: Please see the blog post [http://openrov.com/profiles/blogs/new-recommended-batteries|HERE] for information about batteries.

Edit Step 2  ¶ 

  • Batteries & charger are not included in the kit

  • OpenROV 2.6 is designed so that many different "c-cell" sized rechargeable batters can be used.

  • Please see the blog post HERE for information about batteries.

  • If you plan on using the Trustfire Li-Ion 26650 batteries, no further action is needed.

  • If you plan on using the Batteryspace Li-FePO4 batteries, which we recommend, you will need to build the adapter. The assembly instructions for this are HERE. Don't worry, we will remind you about this later in this guide after your battery tubes are assembled.

  • Batteries, chargers, and adapters can be found in our webstore.

  • Regular c-cell batteries will not work because they can't source enough current to power the ROV.

Edit Step 3  ¶ 

Image 1/2: The pieces for the internal structure come with a paper backing on them which can be removed.  Before doing so, however, it is good to test fit all the pieces to get a feel for how they all go together. Image 2/2: '''Before you start, watch this great video on [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hT6Ow_cBTps|how to use acrylic cement] from TAP Plastics.'''

Edit Step 3  ¶ 

  • To start out, put the internal structure together. You will need the pieces shown (which can be found in the large plastic bag in the kit). The internal structure acts as a central mounting frame for the motors, wiring harness, and electronics tube.

  • The pieces for the internal structure come with a paper backing on them which can be removed. Before doing so, however, it is good to test fit all the pieces to get a feel for how they all go together.

  • Before you start, watch this great video on how to use acrylic cement from TAP Plastics.

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 4  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Remove the paper backing from both sides of the pieces and slide them together as shown. Image 2/3: Push the pieces together as shown. Image 3/3: Make sure they are together all the way and straight, as the cement dries very quickly.

Edit Step 4  ¶ 

  • Your very first step will be to cement together the ROV handle and horizontal shroud support... Here we go!!

  • Remove the paper backing from both sides of the pieces and slide them together as shown.

  • Push the pieces together as shown.

  • Make sure they are together all the way and straight, as the cement dries very quickly.

  • Apply cement to the joint between the two parts

  • The best way to apply cement is to hold the syringe bottle upright (tip at the top) and squeeze out a bunch of air, so when you turn the syringe bottle upside-down (and don't squeeze the bottle), air will burble inward and not allow cement to flow out. When you're ready to apply cement, lightly squeeze the bottle to overcome the vacuum pressure.

Edit Step 5  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Remove the paper backing from both sides of all the pieces and assemble them together as shown. We will be cementing the three small pieces first. Image 2/3: Once the pieces are in place apply the cement to bond them together. Image 3/3: Ensure the pieces form 90 degree angles to the piece upon which they are being glued.

Edit Step 5  ¶ 

  • Now it is time to cement the mounts for the motors.

  • Remove the paper backing from both sides of all the pieces and assemble them together as shown. We will be cementing the three small pieces first.

  • Once the pieces are in place apply the cement to bond them together.

  • Ensure the pieces form 90 degree angles to the piece upon which they are being glued.

  • Next attach the largest piece and cement it to the three that you just put together.

Edit Step 6  ¶ 

Image 1/1: It should be a snug fit, so don't hesitate to push a bit to get it in place.

Edit Step 6  ¶ 

  • Next, attach the handle/horizontal shroud support piece that you made in the previous step.

  • It should be a snug fit, so don't hesitate to push a bit to get it in place.

Edit Step 7  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Next we will cement a little tab (the small rectangular piece with a hole in the center) to the top of the handle. Make sure to remove the paper before cementing it. This is for the propeller shrouds to rest against later. Image 2/3: Next we will cement a little tab (the small rectangular piece with a hole in the center) to the top of the handle. Make sure to remove the paper before cementing it. This is for the propeller shrouds to rest against later. Image 3/3: Next we will cement a little tab (the small rectangular piece with a hole in the center) to the top of the handle. Make sure to remove the paper before cementing it. This is for the propeller shrouds to rest against later.

Edit Step 7  ¶ 

  • Cement the handle to the motor mounting as seen in the first image.

  • Next we will cement a little tab (the small rectangular piece with a hole in the center) to the top of the handle. Make sure to remove the paper before cementing it. This is for the propeller shrouds to rest against later.

Edit Step 8  ¶ 

Image 1/3: We will attach the Main Tube Cradle pieces. These are the L shaped ones that hold the electronics tube. Once they are in place cement them together. Be generous with the amount of cement used in the areas indicated to keep these parts from breaking off. Image 2/3: Finally, we will attach the last two pieces! These "doublers" help to hold this assembly in the frame. The second image shows the pieces (the ones shaped like the monsters from pac-man) being cemented on. Image 3/3: When attaching these pieces make sure that the tab is facing up as shown.

Edit Step 8  ¶ 

  • You're almost done with the internal structure! After cementing the Main Tube Cradle pieces and Bulkhead Supports, you'll be done with the internal structure.

  • We will attach the Main Tube Cradle pieces. These are the L shaped ones that hold the electronics tube. Once they are in place cement them together. Be generous with the amount of cement used in the areas indicated to keep these parts from breaking off.

  • Finally, we will attach the last two pieces! These "doublers" help to hold this assembly in the frame. The second image shows the pieces (the ones shaped like the monsters from pac-man) being cemented on.

  • When attaching these pieces make sure that the tab is facing up as shown.

  • Because there are no notches or grooves to hold the doublers in place, you'll need to be careful that they are held in the correct position as the cement sets up.

  • The Internal Structure is now assembled! Now is the time to inspect all the joints between each part and make sure every interface has been cemented. Apply additional cement to any gaps or missed joints.

  • Congratulations! You have completed the internal frame assembly!

Edit Step 9  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Start by removing the motor bell (the metal cylinder surrounding the motor) using small pliers or a screw driver to pry off the c-clip.  Once removed, set the c-clips aside as you will need them later. Image 2/3: It is recommended that you wear eye protection while removing the c-clip as it has a tendency to fly off at a high velocity. Image 3/3: Once the C-clip is removed, the bell can be pulled straight off the motor.  It may take a fair amount of force before the bell comes off.

Edit Step 9  ¶ 

  • We'll need to make a few modifications to the brushless motors so that they can work underwater. The main modification we'll make will be to attach new wire leads with waterproof insulation.

  • Start by removing the motor bell (the metal cylinder surrounding the motor) using small pliers or a screw driver to pry off the c-clip. Once removed, set the c-clips aside as you will need them later.

  • It is recommended that you wear eye protection while removing the c-clip as it has a tendency to fly off at a high velocity.

  • Once the C-clip is removed, the bell can be pulled straight off the motor. It may take a fair amount of force before the bell comes off.

  • Use a sharp razor to remove the outer shrink tubing from the motor lead bundle. Be sure not to damage the thin magnet wires coming from the motors, as this will damage the motor.

  • In order to keep the motor waterproof there can not be no exposed copper wire. The wire that makes up the windings are covered in enamel to keep them insulated. The ends are the only part where the enamel has been removed and as such can be soldered to.

  • Be careful when using the razor to keep from cutting yourself.

  • Now cut a slit in the inner shrink tubing on each of the wires. The slit only needs to go from the center of the tubing outward (you don't need to cut along the entire length of the tubing) This way, you won't damage the wires coming from the motor, and you'll be able to pull off the shrink tubing once you de-solder the original motor leads.

Edit Step 10  ¶ 

Image 1/1: If you are new to soldering, we recommend that you check out these links to help you get up to speed.

Edit Step 10  ¶ 

  • We're now at the step where we begin soldering.

  • If you are new to soldering, we recommend that you check out these links to help you get up to speed.

  • Video (concise, step-by-step)

  • How-To Guide (a very basic intro)

  • When soldering it is recommended that you wear safety glasses and have air circulation in the room you are working.

Edit Step 11  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Small needle nose pliers are helpful for removing the heat shrink. Image 2/3: Small needle nose pliers are helpful for removing the heat shrink. Image 3/3: Small needle nose pliers are helpful for removing the heat shrink.

Edit Step 11  ¶ 

  • Heat the solder junctions with an iron to remove the leadwires. After the leadwires have been pulled off, the shrink tubing should be easy to pull off as well.

  • Small needle nose pliers are helpful for removing the heat shrink.

Edit Step 12  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Strip a small amount of insulation off the ends of nine of the one-meter wires, tin them, and solder them to the motors. Image 2/3: After soldering each leadwire, inspect that the solder joint is smooth and shiny (not dull and rough, which would indicate a "cold solder joint" that won't conduct or hold well). Image 3/3: Tinning a wire means to melt solder onto the stripped part of the wire before attaching it to another wire.

Edit Step 12  ¶ 

  • Next, cut a total of 17 pieces of one-meter long 20awg stranded wire. (Nine will be attached to the three motors, two will be attached to the spring terminals for the two battery packs, and six will be used as auxiliary wires for external devices.)

  • Strip a small amount of insulation off the ends of nine of the one-meter wires, tin them, and solder them to the motors.

  • After soldering each leadwire, inspect that the solder joint is smooth and shiny (not dull and rough, which would indicate a "cold solder joint" that won't conduct or hold well).

  • Tinning a wire means to melt solder onto the stripped part of the wire before attaching it to another wire.

  • A cold solder joint is when the wires and solder are not heated to a high enough temperature resulting in a bad joint that has a higher tendency to fail.

1 Edit Step 13  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Apply a small amount of hot glue to the joint as shown. Make sure not to get any of the hot glue on the motor. Image 2/2: With the hot glue still warm, slide the heat shrink tubing over the joint.

1 Edit Step 13  ¶ 

  • Cut quantity 9 pieces of waterproof heat shrink tubing, length should be 2-3cm.

  • Apply a small amount of hot glue to the joint as shown. Make sure not to get any of the hot glue on the motor.

  • With the hot glue still warm, slide the heat shrink tubing over the joint.

  • Make sure the pieces of shrink tubing are slid all the way up the wires so that each solder joint is completely covered.

  • Heat the tubing with a heat gun until the gel lining and hot glue inside oozes out from the tubing on both sides.

1 Edit Step 14  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Shrink the larger tubing over the bundle of wires for each motor as shown. Image 2/3: Repeat these steps until you have three completed motors.The motors are now ready! Image 3/3: The blue heatshrink will shrink at a temperature of 215 F.

1 Edit Step 14  ¶ 

  • Cover the waterproof shrink tubing in each bundle with a 3 to 4cm- long piece of larger, regular shrink tubing.

  • Shrink the larger tubing over the bundle of wires for each motor as shown.

  • Repeat these steps until you have three completed motors.The motors are now ready!

  • The blue heatshrink will shrink at a temperature of 215 F.

Edit Step 15  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Use a medium grit sand paper to roughen a corner of the spring terminal.  The spring terminal has two holes- one with a lip and one without a lip.  You'll want to roughen one of the corners near the hole without the lip (the hole with the lip is better for allowing the wire leading to the other terminal to pass through without chafing) Image 2/3: Melt a glob of solder onto the sanded area of the terminal. Image 3/3: Strip and tin one of the one-meter wires, pass the stripped part of the wire through the hole without the lip, fold the stripped part of the wire onto the glob of solder you've made on the terminal, then solder the two together.

Edit Step 15  ¶ 

  • We will now assemble the battery tubes.

  • Use a medium grit sand paper to roughen a corner of the spring terminal. The spring terminal has two holes- one with a lip and one without a lip. You'll want to roughen one of the corners near the hole without the lip (the hole with the lip is better for allowing the wire leading to the other terminal to pass through without chafing)

  • Melt a glob of solder onto the sanded area of the terminal.

  • Strip and tin one of the one-meter wires, pass the stripped part of the wire through the hole without the lip, fold the stripped part of the wire onto the glob of solder you've made on the terminal, then solder the two together.

  • The spring terminal has a fairly large thermal mass (large amount of metal to be heated). The spring pressure also can be quite high when fully assembled, and can pop out the batteries later. Use a pair of vice grip pliers to fully compress the spring securely before soldering, this will keep you from getting burned, and relax the spring.

  • Repeat these steps with an additional piece of wire on the second spring terminal.

  • When soldering it is recommended that you wear safety glasses and have air circulation in the room you are working.

1 Edit Step 16  ¶ 

Image 1/3: You'll need two longer lengths of stranded 20awg wire for the forward button terminals in each battery pack.  Cut two lengths of wire that are each 120cm long. Image 2/3: Thread the wire from the spring terminal through one of the holes on the sanded plastic disk, and the new 120cm-long wire through the other hole on the disk as well as the empty hole (the one with the lip) on the spring terminal as shown. Image 3/3: Apply super glue (cyanoacrylate) to the roughened surface of the plastic disk. It's not a bad idea to wear rubber gloves when working with super glue so that way you can avoid getting it on your hands.

1 Edit Step 16  ¶ 

  • Sand one side of the plastic disk with two holes (as shown). This will create a better surface for the spring terminal to bond to. Also roughen the bottom side of the spring terminal with sand paper.

  • You'll need two longer lengths of stranded 20awg wire for the forward button terminals in each battery pack. Cut two lengths of wire that are each 120cm long.

  • Thread the wire from the spring terminal through one of the holes on the sanded plastic disk, and the new 120cm-long wire through the other hole on the disk as well as the empty hole (the one with the lip) on the spring terminal as shown.

  • Apply super glue (cyanoacrylate) to the roughened surface of the plastic disk. It's not a bad idea to wear rubber gloves when working with super glue so that way you can avoid getting it on your hands.

  • The corners of the spring terminal will the be the part that actually contacts the plastic disk, so make sure you apply super glue to places those corners will touch.

  • Place the spring terminal down against the plastic disk. Make sure the holes on the spring terminal align with the holes on the disk.

  • Allow the super glue to fully cure and stop offgassing (make sure there is no more smell of super glue) before moving to the next step. If you do not, then when you seal the spring in the tube then the vapor from the super glue will coat the spring and can cause a poor connection. (Your spring will look like it is white).

  • When working with cyanoacrylate (super glue) it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 17  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Before cementing the inner disk with the spring terminal to the two outer disks, pull the 120cm-long wire 26cm past the inner disk so that it will reach the forward battery terminal after passing through the battery tube (which will be attached later). Image 2/3: With the wire extending 26cm from the inner disk, cement the middle and inner endcaps together (photo 3). Image 3/3: When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 17  ¶ 

  • Cement the outer (the largest one) and middle aft endcap disk (the C shaped one) together. Make sure that the rounded grove in the edge of the smaller piece is aligned with the hole on the larger piece, and the two disks are concentric.

  • Before cementing the inner disk with the spring terminal to the two outer disks, pull the 120cm-long wire 26cm past the inner disk so that it will reach the forward battery terminal after passing through the battery tube (which will be attached later).

  • With the wire extending 26cm from the inner disk, cement the middle and inner endcaps together (photo 3).

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 18  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Place the aft endcap assembly into the sanded end of the battery tube.  The fit will be snug.  If you find it too hard to get the endcap assembly into the tube, you can use sandpaper to taper the edge of the endcap assembly to help guide it in straightly. Image 2/2: A small amount of acrylic cement can be applied between the rim of the endcap and the battery tube.  Although the two parts are different types of plastics (so the cement won't bond well), it should soften both pieces to create a seal that will help prevent epoxy from leaking out during potting (which will be done later).

Edit Step 18  ¶ 

  • Sand (something around 150 grit) ONLY ONE inner surface of each battery tube. This end will be the side that the aft (spring terminal) endcap assembly will be permanently attached too. (The other end must stay smooth so that the o-ring on the other endcap will seal against it)

  • Place the aft endcap assembly into the sanded end of the battery tube. The fit will be snug. If you find it too hard to get the endcap assembly into the tube, you can use sandpaper to taper the edge of the endcap assembly to help guide it in straightly.

  • A small amount of acrylic cement can be applied between the rim of the endcap and the battery tube. Although the two parts are different types of plastics (so the cement won't bond well), it should soften both pieces to create a seal that will help prevent epoxy from leaking out during potting (which will be done later).

  • Once you've done this for both battery packs, you can set them aside (for the time being)

Edit Step 19  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Start out by removing the plunger from both syringes.  We're going to cut the syringe tubes in two locations. Image 2/2: Make sure to set aside the plunger in a safe place as this is needed to seal the electronics tube.

Edit Step 19  ¶ 

  • We're now going to build the endcaps for the electronics tube of the ROV.

  • Start out by removing the plunger from both syringes. We're going to cut the syringe tubes in two locations.

  • Make sure to set aside the plunger in a safe place as this is needed to seal the electronics tube.

Edit Step 20  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Careful not to cut this so short that plunger wont stop where it would usually when inserted. -> this means that you want the dispensing tip of the syringe to make an end for this piece. This is a cylinder that is partially closed at one end, so that the plunger won't go all the way through. See step 34 where this piece is being used. Image 2/3: Then cut at the .16 mL mark as shown. Image 3/3: Then cut at the .16 mL mark as shown.

Edit Step 20  ¶ 

  • Cut the syringes with a hacksaw just above its plunger stop as shown.

  • Careful not to cut this so short that plunger wont stop where it would usually when inserted. -> this means that you want the dispensing tip of the syringe to make an end for this piece. This is a cylinder that is partially closed at one end, so that the plunger won't go all the way through. See step 34 where this piece is being used.

  • Then cut at the .16 mL mark as shown.

Edit Step 21  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 21  ¶ 

  • Use medium grit sandpaper to smooth the edges and square them up.

Edit Step 22  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Remove any grit or dust left inside. Image 2/2: If you have a Q-tip handy, you can also use that (wetted with water or alcohol) to clean the inside of the syringe section.

Edit Step 22  ¶ 

  • Using a razor, you can debur the inside edge of the syringe section, but be careful not to make any large gashes along the inside surface!

  • Remove any grit or dust left inside.

  • If you have a Q-tip handy, you can also use that (wetted with water or alcohol) to clean the inside of the syringe section.

  • Compressed air also works well to clean the inside.

  • Make sure to be careful with the razor as it is sharp.

Edit Step 23  ¶ 

Image 1/1: Peel the backing from the acrylic and clean the disks.

Edit Step 23  ¶ 

  • Now we're going to start cementing the endcap disks together.

  • Peel the backing from the acrylic and clean the disks.

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 24  ¶ 

Image 1/1: Insert the syringe so that the end with the plunger stop is facing down and is flush with the bottom surface of the 3mm disc as shown.

Edit Step 24  ¶ 

  • Place the 6mm disc on top of the 3mm disc.

  • Insert the syringe so that the end with the plunger stop is facing down and is flush with the bottom surface of the 3mm disc as shown.

Edit Step 25  ¶ 

Image 1/3: A good technique for cementing the disks together is to insert the syringe needle between the top of the two disks while pinching the bottom as shown. Image 2/3: Allow cement to flow between the two disks so that it fills the gap between them from the bottom, up.  (You may want to wear gloves, as some cement tends to leak out the bottom).  Fill until the cement is about half way, then remove the syringe and squeeze the disks together so that cement is pushed across the entire interface between the disks. Image 3/3: You may want to rotate the disks about each-other slightly to spread cement around, but be sure that the two holes toward the edges of the disks are aligned before the cement sets.

Edit Step 25  ¶ 

  • Make as much surface area between the two discs cemented.

  • A good technique for cementing the disks together is to insert the syringe needle between the top of the two disks while pinching the bottom as shown.

  • Allow cement to flow between the two disks so that it fills the gap between them from the bottom, up. (You may want to wear gloves, as some cement tends to leak out the bottom). Fill until the cement is about half way, then remove the syringe and squeeze the disks together so that cement is pushed across the entire interface between the disks.

  • You may want to rotate the disks about each-other slightly to spread cement around, but be sure that the two holes toward the edges of the disks are aligned before the cement sets.

  • Extra cement that drips out from the disks can be blotted up with a paper towel.

Edit Step 26  ¶ 

Image 1/1: Cement it in place if it isn't already.

Edit Step 26  ¶ 

  • Make sure the cut syringe is flush with the surface of the inner disc (the 3mm disk).

  • Cement it in place if it isn't already.

Edit Step 27  ¶ 

Image 1/1: You should now have two identical parts as shown.

Edit Step 27  ¶ 

  • Do the same thing for the other syringe, 3mm disc and 6mm disc.

  • You should now have two identical parts as shown.

Edit Step 28  ¶ 

Image 1/1: Orient the flat edge towards you and place each one on top of the endcaps as shown.

Edit Step 28  ¶ 

  • Next, find the two 1.5mm clear discs with the flat edge.

  • Orient the flat edge towards you and place each one on top of the endcaps as shown.

  • The edges have been marked with blue to show the orientation.

Edit Step 29  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Make sure the inside circle and the syringe are concentric as shown. Image 2/2: Make sure the inside circle and the syringe are concentric as shown.

Edit Step 29  ¶ 

  • Use the same technique as before to cement the 1.5mm disc to the 6mm disc.

  • Make sure the inside circle and the syringe are concentric as shown.

Edit Step 30  ¶ 

Image 1/1: Place them on top of the newly cemented 1.5mm disc.

Edit Step 30  ¶ 

  • Now find the 6mm disc with the cut out.

  • Place them on top of the newly cemented 1.5mm disc.

  • Orient as shown. The edges have been marked in blue for clarification.

Edit Step 31  ¶ 

Image 1/3: After all the discs have been cemented together, allow a little more cement to run around the perimeter of each gap to make sure all the edges of the discs are well joined. Image 2/3: After all the discs have been cemented together, allow a little more cement to run around the perimeter of each gap to make sure all the edges of the discs are well joined. Image 3/3: After all the discs have been cemented together, allow a little more cement to run around the perimeter of each gap to make sure all the edges of the discs are well joined.

Edit Step 31  ¶ 

  • Try to keep the 6mm disc with the cut out concentric and cement it to the 1.5mm disc with the same technique as before.

  • After all the discs have been cemented together, allow a little more cement to run around the perimeter of each gap to make sure all the edges of the discs are well joined.

Edit Step 32  ¶ 

Image 1/2: You should have two endcaps that are mirror images of each other. Image 2/2: Don't cement the white endcap flanges onto the endcaps yet!

Edit Step 32  ¶ 

  • Congratulations! You have completed most of the electronics tube endcaps. Now, we'll check to see if they fit well in the main tube.

  • You should have two endcaps that are mirror images of each other.

  • Don't cement the white endcap flanges onto the endcaps yet!

Edit Step 33  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Start out by beveling the inner edge of the main tube using a medium grit sand paper so that the o-ring will fit in the tube without getting damaged by the sharpness of the tube's inner edge. Wipe off all the dust left over from the sanding process when done. Image 2/2: BE CAREFUL NOT TO SAND THE INNER SURFACE OF THE TUBE WHERE THE O-RING WILL BE. THIS PART MUST BE KEPT COMPLETELY SMOOTH. ONLY CHAMFER THE EDGE!

Edit Step 33  ¶ 

  • In these steps, we'll check that the endcaps make a good fit in the Main Tube.

  • Start out by beveling the inner edge of the main tube using a medium grit sand paper so that the o-ring will fit in the tube without getting damaged by the sharpness of the tube's inner edge. Wipe off all the dust left over from the sanding process when done.

  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO SAND THE INNER SURFACE OF THE TUBE WHERE THE O-RING WILL BE. THIS PART MUST BE KEPT COMPLETELY SMOOTH. ONLY CHAMFER THE EDGE!

Edit Step 34  ¶ 

Image 1/2: The stem of each syringe plunger should be cut so that it is flush with the outer surface of the endcap as shown. (This way it will be held in place when the main tube is placed inside the shell of the ROV) Image 2/2: Place a #340 o-ring (the medium-sized, fat one) in the grooves ("o-ring glands") of both endcaps

Edit Step 34  ¶ 

  • We'll now place syringe plungers into the holes for each main endcap. These plungers seal the endcaps during use, but can be pulled out momentarily to relieve pressure after the endcaps get seated (which pressurizes the air inside the main tube)

  • The stem of each syringe plunger should be cut so that it is flush with the outer surface of the endcap as shown. (This way it will be held in place when the main tube is placed inside the shell of the ROV)

  • Place a #340 o-ring (the medium-sized, fat one) in the grooves ("o-ring glands") of both endcaps

  • Since the o-ring will make a pretty tight fit with the main tube when pushed out to the right diameter, it is recommended that a lubricant be used on top of the o-ring (we like to use a commonly available lubricant called "MagicLube" which is available at many hardware stores) to assure the o-ring gets seated properly

1 Edit Step 35  ¶ 

Image 1/2: VERY IMPORTANT: Because the tolerances of the pieces may vary slightly, it's possible that your endcap may not engage tightly enough with the main tube. (You can see an example of what this looks like in the second image). Image 2/2: If the endcap doesn't fit well, the band of engaged o-ring will be very thin or may even disappear in spots.  If this is the case, send us an email at [http://info@openrov.com|info@openrov.com] with an image of your endcap in the main tube (like the images shown) and we'll make sure you end up with parts that fit.

1 Edit Step 35  ¶ 

  • Place both endcaps into the main tube, and inspect to make sure that at least a 1mm-thick band of the o-ring is pressed against the inside of the main tube. Rotate the tube to make sure the o-rig engages along the entire interior perimeter of the tube.

  • VERY IMPORTANT: Because the tolerances of the pieces may vary slightly, it's possible that your endcap may not engage tightly enough with the main tube. (You can see an example of what this looks like in the second image).

  • If the endcap doesn't fit well, the band of engaged o-ring will be very thin or may even disappear in spots. If this is the case, send us an email at info@openrov.com with an image of your endcap in the main tube (like the images shown) and we'll make sure you end up with parts that fit.

  • Once you've tested the fit of your endcaps, put them in a clean place (like a zip lock bag) so dust and particles don't get on the o-rings.

Edit Step 36  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Start by removing the two set screws at the base of the motor. Image 2/3: Find the motor that comes off of the base the easiest and mark this one and use it as your vertical motor. Image 3/3: Rotate the motor in the base so the wires are coming out directly to the right of the screws, as seen in the third picture.

Edit Step 36  ¶ 

  • Now we are going to arrange the motors in relation to the mounting base.

  • Start by removing the two set screws at the base of the motor.

  • Find the motor that comes off of the base the easiest and mark this one and use it as your vertical motor.

  • Rotate the motor in the base so the wires are coming out directly to the right of the screws, as seen in the third picture.

  • Insert the set screws back in and tighten them.

Edit Step 37  ¶ 

Image 1/3: It is easiest to mount the vertical motor first. The motor leads should go to the left of the upside-down internal structure (which will actually be the right or "starboard" side of the right-side-up ROV. Image 2/3: The vertical motor should be the one that comes off the base the easiest (you should have it marked from an earlier step). Make sure when you are positioning it that the set screws are in the positions shown. Image 3/3: When attaching the horizontal motors make sure the M1.5 set screw is in an accessible position in case it needs to be adjusted later.

Edit Step 37  ¶ 

  • Attach the motors to the inner structure using M2 screws, lock washers, and nuts.

  • It is easiest to mount the vertical motor first. The motor leads should go to the left of the upside-down internal structure (which will actually be the right or "starboard" side of the right-side-up ROV.

  • The vertical motor should be the one that comes off the base the easiest (you should have it marked from an earlier step). Make sure when you are positioning it that the set screws are in the positions shown.

  • When attaching the horizontal motors make sure the M1.5 set screw is in an accessible position in case it needs to be adjusted later.

  • The lock washer should go on the same side as the nut.

  • If you need to adjust where the wire is coming from the motor, you can loosen the M1.5 set screws, make the adjustment, and then tighten them again.

  • Now take the six auxiliary wires (each is 1 meter) that you cut earlier and mount them to the frame underneath the forward/backwards motors with a zip-tie.

  • If you don't have any small zip ties laying around, you can find some in the boxes for the Electric Speed Controllers.

Edit Step 38  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Because "left" and "right" are relative terms (they depend on which way you're facing), ships and other vessels often use "port" and "starboard" which are always the same side, regardless of your own orientation.  When you're facing forward (and upright) "port" is on the left side, and "starboard" is on the right side. Image 2/3: Label the three-wire bundles coming from each motor.  We use "P" for the port (left when upright) motor, "V" for the vertical motor, and "S" for the starboard (right when upright) motor. Image 3/3: Make sure the labels are near the end of each of the wires.

Edit Step 38  ¶ 

  • Insert the internal frame into the outer shell, and using four large reusable zip ties, mount the battery tubes as shown.

  • Because "left" and "right" are relative terms (they depend on which way you're facing), ships and other vessels often use "port" and "starboard" which are always the same side, regardless of your own orientation. When you're facing forward (and upright) "port" is on the left side, and "starboard" is on the right side.

  • Label the three-wire bundles coming from each motor. We use "P" for the port (left when upright) motor, "V" for the vertical motor, and "S" for the starboard (right when upright) motor.

  • Make sure the labels are near the end of each of the wires.

  • Now label each of the battery packs. (We use "BP" for "Battery- Port" and "BS" for "Battery- Starboard". You'll also want to trace the longer wire on each battery pack (the one that goes all the way to the front of each tube) and label them "BP+" and "BS+", respectively, so that you can later identify the polarity of each wire.

Edit Step 39  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Strongly consider uncoiling the tether at this point to relieve its residual torsion so you can more easily unwind it during deployment.  Follow [http://openrov.dozuki.com/Guide/Prepare+a+Tether+Management+System/5|these steps].  It's easiest to do this before the tether is connected to the OpenROV, though you can also defer it and do it after. Image 2/2: First take the tether wire, the twisted pair of two colors, and run it so its length matches that of the wires connected to the motors. It should run in the middle by the handle, as seen in the picture.

Edit Step 39  ¶ 

  • Now we are going to do some wire management.

  • Strongly consider uncoiling the tether at this point to relieve its residual torsion so you can more easily unwind it during deployment. Follow these steps. It's easiest to do this before the tether is connected to the OpenROV, though you can also defer it and do it after.

  • First take the tether wire, the twisted pair of two colors, and run it so its length matches that of the wires connected to the motors. It should run in the middle by the handle, as seen in the picture.

  • Secure all of the wiring bundles with zip ties as shown. You can find small zip ties in the boxes for the Electric Speed Controllers. (Note that in this image, you can see I decided to point the bundle coming from the starboard motor downward instead of its original orientation where it was pointing to the left)

  • The collective bundle of wires (we'll call it the main wiring harness) should snake around in a loop as shown. This will make it so less precise measuring is needed when running the harness through the endcap, and will also allow for motors to be replaced more easily in the future.

Edit Step 40  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Place one of the shrouds against the supports as shown.  You can hold it in place with your finger. Image 2/3: Add acrylic cement to the points indicated in the picture. Image 3/3: Do the same for the other shroud.

Edit Step 40  ¶ 

  • Now we'll cement the shrouds in place.

  • Place one of the shrouds against the supports as shown. You can hold it in place with your finger.

  • Add acrylic cement to the points indicated in the picture.

  • Do the same for the other shroud.

Edit Step 41  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Now we're going to route the yellow mesh sleeve material over the main wire harness.  The sleeve material expands when it is compressed much like how a finger trap works. Image 2/3: Start by wrapping tape around the ends of all the wires in the main harness as shown.  The purpose of this is to prevent the sleeve material from getting snagged as it is placed over the harness. Image 3/3: If only a few individual wires are left sticking out of the tape, and their labels are further down the wire, those ends can be snipped off.

Edit Step 41  ¶ 

  • Before routing the yellow mesh count the wires that you have in your bundle. There should be a total of 21: 9 motor, 4 battery, 6 auxiliary, and 2 tether.

  • Now we're going to route the yellow mesh sleeve material over the main wire harness. The sleeve material expands when it is compressed much like how a finger trap works.

  • Start by wrapping tape around the ends of all the wires in the main harness as shown. The purpose of this is to prevent the sleeve material from getting snagged as it is placed over the harness.

  • If only a few individual wires are left sticking out of the tape, and their labels are further down the wire, those ends can be snipped off.

  • Push the sleeve over the main wiring harness and slide it all the way down until its end goes past the bulkhead of the internal structure.

Edit Step 42  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:

Edit Step 42  ¶ 

  • To keep the sleeve material from fraying (beyond what it will have already done while putting it on) wrap both ends with electrical tape where the fraying stops.

Edit Step 43  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Insert one threaded rod into the rear-most set of holds on the bottom of the shell and the other rod either all the way forward, or the second hole in from forward. Image 2/2: Placing the rod in the furthest-forward set of holes is best for ROV balance and strength, but may interfere with the field of view of the camera later on. It's easy to switch this if you change your mind!

Edit Step 43  ¶ 

  • Add one non-locking M5 nut to each end of each threaded rod, about 1cm in from each end.

  • Insert one threaded rod into the rear-most set of holds on the bottom of the shell and the other rod either all the way forward, or the second hole in from forward.

  • Placing the rod in the furthest-forward set of holes is best for ROV balance and strength, but may interfere with the field of view of the camera later on. It's easy to switch this if you change your mind!

  • Attach locking nuts to the ends of the threaded rod. The locking nuts are the ones with the white nylon inserts inside of them instead of just being all metal.

Edit Step 44  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Wrap the ROV tether around the zip tie. Image 2/3: Wrap the zip tie and tether with electrical tape. Image 3/3: Now that your ROV is complete, take one of the OpenROV stickers and place it on the back of the ROV!

Edit Step 44  ¶ 

  • To prevent your ROV tether from getting twisted in the motors add a zip tie to the circular hole in the handle at the back of the ROV. Do not cut the zip tie.

  • Wrap the ROV tether around the zip tie.

  • Wrap the zip tie and tether with electrical tape.

  • Now that your ROV is complete, take one of the OpenROV stickers and place it on the back of the ROV!

Edit Step 45  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Thread the wiring harness through the Port endcap.  The harness should go from the outside of the endcap, inward.  You can make sure you're going through the correct endcap by placing it in the position as shown. In this position, the flat edge of the endcap should face toward the port battery tube. Image 2/3: During this step, we'll measure out the right length of the wiring harness so that it is not too tight or too loose when the end cap is in place. Adjust your wiring harness and end cap so that they resemble the photo above. Image 3/3: During this step, we'll measure out the right length of the wiring harness so that it is not too tight or too loose when the end cap is in place. Adjust your wiring harness and end cap so that they resemble the photo above.

Edit Step 45  ¶ 

  • Use scissors to cut off left over frayed ends of the sleeve material up to the electrical tape.

  • Thread the wiring harness through the Port endcap. The harness should go from the outside of the endcap, inward. You can make sure you're going through the correct endcap by placing it in the position as shown. In this position, the flat edge of the endcap should face toward the port battery tube.

  • During this step, we'll measure out the right length of the wiring harness so that it is not too tight or too loose when the end cap is in place. Adjust your wiring harness and end cap so that they resemble the photo above.

Edit Step 46  ¶ 

Image 1/3: A good way to make sure they are fully bonded is to use your body weight as a clamp. Once the white piece is cemented, place it on a flat surface and then push firmly with your hands for about 20 seconds. Image 2/3: You'll also want to cement the other white endcap cover onto the other (Starboard) endcap. Image 3/3: Apply hot glue around the part of the endcap the wire harness enters through (the side with the rectangular opening- not the side with a circular opening).  This hot glue will form a barrier that will prevent epoxy from leaking out when the endcap is potted.

Edit Step 46  ¶ 

  • Once the tension of the main wire harness looks good, you can cement the white endcap cover onto the endcap. Be sure the endcap cover is pressed firmly against the endcap near where the harness passes through the assembly.

  • A good way to make sure they are fully bonded is to use your body weight as a clamp. Once the white piece is cemented, place it on a flat surface and then push firmly with your hands for about 20 seconds.

  • You'll also want to cement the other white endcap cover onto the other (Starboard) endcap.

  • Apply hot glue around the part of the endcap the wire harness enters through (the side with the rectangular opening- not the side with a circular opening). This hot glue will form a barrier that will prevent epoxy from leaking out when the endcap is potted.

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 47  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Apply a glob of hot glue to the end of each of the six auxiliary wires, then after each glob has hardened, bundle the ends together and apply hot glue to the bundle. Image 2/3: If your purchased an [http://store.openrov.com/collections/frontpage/products/openrov-imu-depth-module|IMU] with your kit, only hot glue two of the wires and leave the other four free to be soldered to the IMU. Image 3/3: The six auxiliary wires can be used later to attach external payloads like sensors and actuators.  While these are not being used, the ends should be sealed so water can't travel down the wires underneath the insulation into the the electronics tube (an effect known as "hosing").   To prevent this, we'll seal the ends of the wires with hot glue.

Edit Step 47  ¶ 

  • The other (starboard) endcap can also be prepared for potting at this time. Create a barrier of hot glue at the end of the endcap channel to hold the epoxy in.

  • Apply a glob of hot glue to the end of each of the six auxiliary wires, then after each glob has hardened, bundle the ends together and apply hot glue to the bundle.

  • If your purchased an IMU with your kit, only hot glue two of the wires and leave the other four free to be soldered to the IMU.

  • The six auxiliary wires can be used later to attach external payloads like sensors and actuators. While these are not being used, the ends should be sealed so water can't travel down the wires underneath the insulation into the the electronics tube (an effect known as "hosing"). To prevent this, we'll seal the ends of the wires with hot glue.

Edit Step 48  ¶ 

Image 1/2: We'll also pot the two battery tubes during this period.  The tubes can be dangled over the edge of a table from the internal structure as shown (so that the epoxy they are potted with doesn't flow out the hole it is injected into) Image 2/2: We'll also pot the two battery tubes during this period.  The tubes can be dangled over the edge of a table from the internal structure as shown (so that the epoxy they are potted with doesn't flow out the hole it is injected into)

Edit Step 48  ¶ 

  • Now, we're going to prepare the endcap to be potted. To start, we'll want to bundle the wires coming out of the endcap together.

  • We'll also pot the two battery tubes during this period. The tubes can be dangled over the edge of a table from the internal structure as shown (so that the epoxy they are potted with doesn't flow out the hole it is injected into)

Edit Step 49  ¶ 

Image 1/3: To help remove voids in the epoxy filing the endcap channel, move the harness up and down (like a toilet plunger) and from side to side.  This may cause the level of the epoxy to fall (as it fills voids).  More epoxy can be added as needed. Image 2/3: Now we pot the aft battery endcaps.  To do this, we'll insert the nozzle from the epoxy cartridge into the small hole on the edge of the endcap. Injected epoxy should flow in both directions around the perimeter of the endcap, then into the channel leading toward the leadwires and out to the channel's two ends. Some may also ooze out the center. Image 3/3: Finally, you'll also want to fill the hole of the Starboard endcap with epoxy.  Just as for the Port endcap, epoxy should come up to just below the rim of the endcap hole.

Edit Step 49  ¶ 

  • You can now start potting the endcap. It is important that all the gaps between the wires in the harness get filled with epoxy. When potting the harness, periodically insert the epoxy nozzle between random sets of wires and move the tip of the nozzle around. Also be sure to inject epoxy under the channel the wires pass through in the endcap.

  • To help remove voids in the epoxy filing the endcap channel, move the harness up and down (like a toilet plunger) and from side to side. This may cause the level of the epoxy to fall (as it fills voids). More epoxy can be added as needed.

  • Now we pot the aft battery endcaps. To do this, we'll insert the nozzle from the epoxy cartridge into the small hole on the edge of the endcap. Injected epoxy should flow in both directions around the perimeter of the endcap, then into the channel leading toward the leadwires and out to the channel's two ends. Some may also ooze out the center.

  • Finally, you'll also want to fill the hole of the Starboard endcap with epoxy. Just as for the Port endcap, epoxy should come up to just below the rim of the endcap hole.

  • Before opening your tube of epoxy leave it so the tip is facing up for about 10 minutes so that the air bubbles will travel to the top. Then open up the tube and insert the mixing nozzle. If this is not done then the epoxy will drip out.

  • When working with epoxy it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 50  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Careful not to use too much or it can run. Image 2/3: Careful not to use too much or it can run. Image 3/3: Careful not to use too much or it can run.

Edit Step 50  ¶ 

  • If you have epoxy left, you can apply some to the shroud as shown in the picture for added strength.

  • Careful not to use too much or it can run.

Edit Step 51  ¶ 

Image 1/2: The first step is to build the Electronics Chassis (also known as the E-Chassis). For this, you'll need the 15 parts shown here (note that if you are building from a kit, the two crescent-shaped blinder pieces in the lower right of the photo may be in a different bag) Image 2/2: The relationship between the sides and the main plate has a certain orientation as seen in the second picture.

Edit Step 51  ¶ 

  • While the potting on the endcap and the battery tubes is drying, we are going to move on the the electronics.

  • The first step is to build the Electronics Chassis (also known as the E-Chassis). For this, you'll need the 15 parts shown here (note that if you are building from a kit, the two crescent-shaped blinder pieces in the lower right of the photo may be in a different bag)

  • The relationship between the sides and the main plate has a certain orientation as seen in the second picture.

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 52  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Next, cement the Servo Mount to the same side of the Main Chassis the Braces are on. Image 2/3: Next, cement the Servo Mount to the same side of the Main Chassis the Braces are on. Image 3/3: Next, cement the Servo Mount to the same side of the Main Chassis the Braces are on.

Edit Step 52  ¶ 

  • Attach the four Braces (two for each Endplate) to the E-Chassis and the side pieces and cement all in place. Also make sure to glue the side pieces to the main platform.

  • Next, cement the Servo Mount to the same side of the Main Chassis the Braces are on.

Edit Step 53  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Next, you'll want to cement the Camera Mount arms to the Camera Platform with the smaller of the two pieces on each arm facing outward (make sure to double check that you have it correct). Image 2/3: When cementing these in place make sure they are at a 90 degree angle to the main piece. Image 3/3: Finally, attach the white blinders to either side of the camera hole.

Edit Step 53  ¶ 

  • Now we'll start making the camera platform. Start by cementing the two pieces for the Camera Mount arms together. The round bases of each piece should end up being concentric, but to aid with cementing, it may be easier to stagger the pieces initially. Of course, be sure to align them before the cement sets!

  • Next, you'll want to cement the Camera Mount arms to the Camera Platform with the smaller of the two pieces on each arm facing outward (make sure to double check that you have it correct).

  • When cementing these in place make sure they are at a 90 degree angle to the main piece.

  • Finally, attach the white blinders to either side of the camera hole.

Edit Step 54  ¶ 

Image 1/3: We'll want to cut the thick lead wires from the ESC down in preparation of stripping and tinning the wires. Cut below the colored heat shrink first, then cut the power and ground wires to similar length. Image 2/3: We'll want to cut the thick lead wires from the ESC down in preparation of stripping and tinning the wires. Cut below the colored heat shrink first, then cut the power and ground wires to similar length. Image 3/3: We'll want to cut the thick lead wires from the ESC down in preparation of stripping and tinning the wires. Cut below the colored heat shrink first, then cut the power and ground wires to similar length.

Edit Step 54  ¶ 

  • Now it's time to attach the ESCs to the OpenROV Controller Board. In each ESC box, you'll find one ESC, two zip ties (which you probably used earlier), and a bag with shrink tubing and double-sided adhesive. You'll want to keep the zip ties and bag, so put them aside for now.

  • We'll want to cut the thick lead wires from the ESC down in preparation of stripping and tinning the wires. Cut below the colored heat shrink first, then cut the power and ground wires to similar length.

Edit Step 55  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Strip wires 4.5cm from base exposing as much wire as possible WITHOUT removing the insulation entirely just like the tutorial mentions. Then tin the wires. Image 2/3: You should end up with five wires that have been tinned throughout most of the exposed wire. Image 3/3: When soldering it is recommended that you wear safety glasses and have air circulation in the room you are working.

Edit Step 55  ¶ 

  • Next we will want to strip and tin the wires. Here is a quick tutorial on how to do both like a pro. Practice on spare white wire you might have first to get the hang of it. http://www.instructables.com/id/Strip-an...

  • Strip wires 4.5cm from base exposing as much wire as possible WITHOUT removing the insulation entirely just like the tutorial mentions. Then tin the wires.

  • You should end up with five wires that have been tinned throughout most of the exposed wire.

  • When soldering it is recommended that you wear safety glasses and have air circulation in the room you are working.

Edit Step 56  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Solder on the wires to the board. Image 2/3: Check the orientation of your speed controllers before soldering. They should be oriented as shown in the first picture. Image 3/3: Cut off any excess wires with diagonal cutters once done soldering.

Edit Step 56  ¶ 

  • Now we will solder the ESCs to the controller board. Place your wires through the appropriate holes. Place the controller board on an ESC box to keep it level with the length of the ESC wires you'll be soldering.

  • Solder on the wires to the board.

  • Check the orientation of your speed controllers before soldering. They should be oriented as shown in the first picture.

  • Cut off any excess wires with diagonal cutters once done soldering.

  • Safety glasses are recommended when using the diagonal cutters.

  • Make sure no stray wires are crossing to the other wires soldered on.

3 Edit Step 57  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Start by soldering the two light panels together. To do this, you'll want to create a small solder blob on the pads on the far left and right of one of the light panels, then attach the leads from the other light panel so that the red wire you're attaching is on the same side as the red already-attached wire (and the same for black). Image 2/3: Apply a small amount of super glue between the two notches in the Camera Platform and place a light panel there. The light panel should be positioned so that its leadwires are aligned with one of the notches, and it should be centered vertically. Image 3/3: If the light panel is too high or too low, the electronic components on the panel may rub against the Electronics Tube. Make sure it is centered to avoid this issue.

3 Edit Step 57  ¶ 

  • Now you have both parts of the E-Chassis and a controller board that's ready for external electronics. Nice job! Next, we're going to attach the lights and camera to the Camera Platform.

  • Start by soldering the two light panels together. To do this, you'll want to create a small solder blob on the pads on the far left and right of one of the light panels, then attach the leads from the other light panel so that the red wire you're attaching is on the same side as the red already-attached wire (and the same for black).

  • Apply a small amount of super glue between the two notches in the Camera Platform and place a light panel there. The light panel should be positioned so that its leadwires are aligned with one of the notches, and it should be centered vertically.

  • If the light panel is too high or too low, the electronic components on the panel may rub against the Electronics Tube. Make sure it is centered to avoid this issue.

  • When working with cyanoacrylate (super glue) it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 58  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Next, remove the plastic piece still attached to the camera by unscrewing the small Phillips-head screw that goes through it. Image 2/3: Using small zip ties (you'll have found two of these in each box the ESCs came in), attach the webcam to the Camera Platform as shown. You'll need to double up the zip ties in order for them to reach around the assembly. Image 3/3: You can use scissors or a diagonal cutter to remove excess zip tie material. You'll want the zip tie heads to be positioned so that they don't bump into the E-Chassis main platform when the Camera Platform is looking all the way up or all the way down.

Edit Step 58  ¶ 

  • Now you'll want to take apart the Genius F100 webcam so it can be mounted to the Camera Platform. Start by pulling the camera off of its stand (a strong tug should do the trick)

  • Next, remove the plastic piece still attached to the camera by unscrewing the small Phillips-head screw that goes through it.

  • Using small zip ties (you'll have found two of these in each box the ESCs came in), attach the webcam to the Camera Platform as shown. You'll need to double up the zip ties in order for them to reach around the assembly.

  • You can use scissors or a diagonal cutter to remove excess zip tie material. You'll want the zip tie heads to be positioned so that they don't bump into the E-Chassis main platform when the Camera Platform is looking all the way up or all the way down.

  • Once everything is secure, you can set the Camera Platform assembly aside for later.

Edit Step 59  ¶ 

Image 1/3: First, pry apart one of the Homeplug adapters using a flathead screwdriver.  It's easier to pry using a twisting motion then a lever motion.  Keep in mind that one of the four walls of the enclosure is attached to the top piece, so prying wont work on that edge. Image 2/3: Once you've opened the Homeplug enclusure, pull the top circuitboard (the one with the power wires going to it) off of the communication board below it.  You can discard everything but the communication board. Image 3/3: Because this board will be mounted very close to other electronics, you may want to cover the bottom of the board with electrical tape (to help prevent anything from accidentally short-circuiting).  This step isn't crucial since the spacing of the boards is designed with sufficient clearance, but it doesn't hurt to have a little extra protection

Edit Step 59  ¶ 

  • Now we will work on the ROV side Ethernet conversion.

  • First, pry apart one of the Homeplug adapters using a flathead screwdriver. It's easier to pry using a twisting motion then a lever motion. Keep in mind that one of the four walls of the enclosure is attached to the top piece, so prying wont work on that edge.

  • Once you've opened the Homeplug enclusure, pull the top circuitboard (the one with the power wires going to it) off of the communication board below it. You can discard everything but the communication board.

  • Because this board will be mounted very close to other electronics, you may want to cover the bottom of the board with electrical tape (to help prevent anything from accidentally short-circuiting). This step isn't crucial since the spacing of the boards is designed with sufficient clearance, but it doesn't hurt to have a little extra protection

  • Attach the ethernet jumper (the one that came in your electronics bag, not the one that came in the Tenda box) to the communication board as shown.

2 Edit Step 60  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Attach the nylon standoff to the hole toward the center of the controller board using a nylon M3 screw as shown. Image 2/3: Attach the nylon standoff to the hole toward the center of the controller board using a nylon M3 screw as shown. Image 3/3: Attach the nylon standoff to the hole toward the center of the controller board using a nylon M3 screw as shown.

2 Edit Step 60  ¶ 

  • Place the communication board on the controller board using two 6-pin reciprocal headers. With the ESCs mounted, it will be a tight fit go get everything on, but with a little finagling, it will all fit.

  • Attach the nylon standoff to the hole toward the center of the controller board using a nylon M3 screw as shown.

Edit Step 61  ¶ 

Image 1/3: You can use the double side adhesive tape that came in the boxes with the ESCs to hold them to the controller board. Image 2/3: Plug the other end of the Ethernet jumper into the BeagleBone Black as shown.  Ultimately, the Ethernet jumper wire will snake around the side of the Homeplug adapter board near the standoff. Image 3/3: Press the BeagleBone Black onto the extended header set on the Controller Board as shown.  Make sure the header pins on each board are aligned with each-other properly!

Edit Step 61  ¶ 

  • Lay the ESCs down on the Controller board as shown. You should be able to tuck the capacitor for each of them under the wires to keep them out of the way.

  • You can use the double side adhesive tape that came in the boxes with the ESCs to hold them to the controller board.

  • Plug the other end of the Ethernet jumper into the BeagleBone Black as shown. Ultimately, the Ethernet jumper wire will snake around the side of the Homeplug adapter board near the standoff.

  • Press the BeagleBone Black onto the extended header set on the Controller Board as shown. Make sure the header pins on each board are aligned with each-other properly!

  • Secure the BeagleBone Black to the nylon standoff using an additional nylon M3 screw.

  • Make sure the PWM wire and the switch for each ESC is accessible as shown in the last picture

Edit Step 62  ¶ 

Image 1/1: For the screw hole closest to the DB-25 connector, the ESC near the edge may need to be lifted slightly to put the screw in place.

Edit Step 62  ¶ 

  • Attach the Controller Board to the E-Chassis using M3 nylon screws and nuts as shown. To orient the board, assure that the three rectangular cut outs on the E-Chassis are aligned with the three groups of solder joints from ESCs on the Controller board.

  • For the screw hole closest to the DB-25 connector, the ESC near the edge may need to be lifted slightly to put the screw in place.

  • Don't overtighten the screws as this will cause the board to flex which is not good. The board should be parallel to the acrylic and only tightened enough to secure it.

Edit Step 63  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Also use the diagonal cutter to remove the corners from the cut-off portion of the horn. This will allow the arm to fit inside the hole cut out in the Camera Mount arm. Image 2/2: Wear eye protection when cutting the servo horn.

Edit Step 63  ¶ 

  • Take the two-arm servo control horn (in the same box as the HS-81 servo) and cut off one of its arms using a diagonal cutter.

  • Also use the diagonal cutter to remove the corners from the cut-off portion of the horn. This will allow the arm to fit inside the hole cut out in the Camera Mount arm.

  • Wear eye protection when cutting the servo horn.

3 Edit Step 64  ¶ 

Image 1/1: To do this '''gently''' rotate it back and forth to its extreme left and extreme right.  You can remove the horn and then adjust how the horn is placed on the servo so that it centered between the extremes.  (see diagram).

3 Edit Step 64  ¶ 

  • Before mounting the servo to the E-Chassis, make sure the horn (white plastic part) is centered.

  • To do this gently rotate it back and forth to its extreme left and extreme right. You can remove the horn and then adjust how the horn is placed on the servo so that it centered between the extremes. (see diagram).

Edit Step 65  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Place the Camera Mount Assembly onto the E-Chassis so that the top of the webcam (the side without the webcam mounting stand tabs) is facing up with servo on the right when the camera is facing toward you. Image 2/3: Attach the arm on the side without a servo to the E-Chassis using an M3 screw and nut. Image 3/3: Do not fully tighten as this screw will act like a hinge and should not create much friction.

Edit Step 65  ¶ 

  • Loosely attach the servo to the E-Chassis using a set of M3 screws and nuts as shown. You'll need the nuts to be just barely threaded onto the screws at first so that the Camera Mount arms can be put into position before being secured. (Make sure the arm is centered - lined up with the camera mount semi-circle.)

  • Place the Camera Mount Assembly onto the E-Chassis so that the top of the webcam (the side without the webcam mounting stand tabs) is facing up with servo on the right when the camera is facing toward you.

  • Attach the arm on the side without a servo to the E-Chassis using an M3 screw and nut.

  • Do not fully tighten as this screw will act like a hinge and should not create much friction.

  • After assuring the servo arm is seated inside the cavity of the Camera Mount arm, tighten the two screws holding the servo in place until they are snug.

Edit Step 66  ¶ 

Image 1/1: The Port ESC (the furthest ESC from the J20 headers- labled as ESC-1) should plug into D6, the Vertical ESC (the middle ESC, labled ESC-2) should plug into D7, and the Starboard ESC (closest to J20) should plug into D8.  The servo should plug into D11

Edit Step 66  ¶ 

  • Plug the servo and ESC plugs into the J20 and J21 headers as shown. The signal wires from each (the white wire on the ESCs and the yellow wire on the servo) should face inward.

  • The Port ESC (the furthest ESC from the J20 headers- labled as ESC-1) should plug into D6, the Vertical ESC (the middle ESC, labled ESC-2) should plug into D7, and the Starboard ESC (closest to J20) should plug into D8. The servo should plug into D11

Edit Step 67  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 67  ¶ 

  • The black and red leads from the lights need to be attached to the controller board. The connections should be at J1 with the black wire going to P1- and the red wire going to P1+.

Edit Step 68  ¶ 

Image 1/1: The newest BeagleBone image is found on Github.  Follow the link and directions [https://github.com/OpenROV/openrov-software/releases|HERE].

Edit Step 68  ¶ 

  • Now is a good time to update the firmware on your Beaglebone. If you bought the OpenROV kit from our webstore, the Beaglebone has an image pre-loaded onto it. This image, while functional, may have a more current version that is available. This is an optional but recommended step.

  • The newest BeagleBone image is found on Github. Follow the link and directions HERE.

3 Edit Step 69  ¶ 

Image 1/3: To keep the USB cable for the webcam out of the way, we'll wrap it around the main platform of the E-Chassis. Because the Electronics Tube will have to fit over the entire assembly, it's important that the wraps of cable are side-by-side and do not stack on top of each-other. Image 2/3: Make sure that the camera platform still has its full range of motion after you have wound the camera wire around the electronics. Image 3/3: Depending on where the end of the doubled-up cable ends up (that seems to vary every time we build an E-Chassis) you can use the velcro strip that came with it, some tape, or a small zip tie to hold it in place.

3 Edit Step 69  ¶ 

  • Next, you can plug in the USB connector for the webcam. You'll want the cable from the connector to bend in the direction toward the DB-25 plug.

  • To keep the USB cable for the webcam out of the way, we'll wrap it around the main platform of the E-Chassis. Because the Electronics Tube will have to fit over the entire assembly, it's important that the wraps of cable are side-by-side and do not stack on top of each-other.

  • Make sure that the camera platform still has its full range of motion after you have wound the camera wire around the electronics.

  • Depending on where the end of the doubled-up cable ends up (that seems to vary every time we build an E-Chassis) you can use the velcro strip that came with it, some tape, or a small zip tie to hold it in place.

  • The resulting bundle should lay flat against the E-Chassis platform, but be pushed to the side enough so that when the camera platform is pointing all the way up or down, the camera doesn't collide with the cable.

2 Edit Step 70  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Start by removing the tape that was used to hold the bundle together. Image 2/3: Next, measure a distance of 17cm from the inside surface of the endcap, and cut one of the wires from the bundle at that length. Measure twice, cut once- you don't want the harness to be too long or too short by more then about 1cm! Before you cut the wires make sure that the labels are below the cut line. Image 3/3: Use the one wire that you've cut as a guide to cut all the remaining wires in the bundle to the same length

2 Edit Step 70  ¶ 

  • Now that the epoxy in your endcap has had a little time to cure, we can get ready to add the DB-25 connector to the end of the wiring harness that passes through the endcap.

  • Start by removing the tape that was used to hold the bundle together.

  • Next, measure a distance of 17cm from the inside surface of the endcap, and cut one of the wires from the bundle at that length. Measure twice, cut once- you don't want the harness to be too long or too short by more then about 1cm! Before you cut the wires make sure that the labels are below the cut line.

  • Use the one wire that you've cut as a guide to cut all the remaining wires in the bundle to the same length

5 Edit Step 71  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Start by stripping off about 3mm of insulation from the end of each wire. If you strip off too much the wires can make contact and cause the system to fail. Image 2/3: Because each stripped wire will just barely fit in the solder cups for the DB-25 connector, it's easiest not to tin the wires before inserting them into their respective positions. Image 3/3: Look on the back of the DB-25 connector (the end with the solder cups) and identify pin 1 (labeled with a faint imprint in the plastic for the connector).

5 Edit Step 71  ¶ 

  • Now you can get ready to solder the DB-25 connector to the end of the newly trimmed wire harness.

  • Start by stripping off about 3mm of insulation from the end of each wire. If you strip off too much the wires can make contact and cause the system to fail.

  • Because each stripped wire will just barely fit in the solder cups for the DB-25 connector, it's easiest not to tin the wires before inserting them into their respective positions.

  • Look on the back of the DB-25 connector (the end with the solder cups) and identify pin 1 (labeled with a faint imprint in the plastic for the connector).

  • Use the guide shown to attach wires to the DB-25 connector. Be sure that battery polarity is correct by measuring for continuity between the forward (positive) terminal in each pack and the other end of the wire it goes too.

    • Check twice solder once. Make sure you have the correct wire in each spot.

    • The four I2C wires and the two AUX wires can be any of the extra six that were potted into the endcap- there is no order that need be put to them at this time. Following the photos later, the yellow strand on the tether line should be TETHER_A (18) and the blue strand should be TETHER_B (19).

    • There should be four pins that are left empty (TP22-TP25).

Edit Step 72  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Start by removing the communication board from the Homeplug adapter in the same way as shown for building the E-Chassis.  The Homeplug Communication Board and Adapter Board mate together as shown. Image 2/3: The male headers on the Adapter Board are a bit short, so it is possible to push the boards together so much that they squeeze together at an angle.  The boards should be mounted so that they are tightly together, but still parallel. Image 3/3: The male headers on the Adapter Board are a bit short, so it is possible to push the boards together so much that they squeeze together at an angle.  The boards should be mounted so that they are tightly together, but still parallel.

Edit Step 72  ¶ 

  • Now, we're going to build the "Topside Adapter" box which will convert your two-wire tether back into standard Ethernet which can be plugged into your computer.

  • Start by removing the communication board from the Homeplug adapter in the same way as shown for building the E-Chassis. The Homeplug Communication Board and Adapter Board mate together as shown.

  • The male headers on the Adapter Board are a bit short, so it is possible to push the boards together so much that they squeeze together at an angle. The boards should be mounted so that they are tightly together, but still parallel.

1 Edit Step 73  ¶ 

Image 1/3: To keep cement and fingerprints from getting on the outside of the panels, it is recommend that the paper backing for the Topside Adapter pieces be kept on until after cementing is finished. Image 2/3: Two pieces (with three sides each) will be cemented separately, then kept together using tape to allow access to the Topside Adapter later on. Image 3/3: Cement the three pieces shown.  Be sure the long, skinny side panel is cemented with the flat side facing away from the side with the Ethernet and USB holes

1 Edit Step 73  ¶ 

  • It is possible to put the housing for the Topside Adapter backward. To avoid this, start out by doing a test fit with the pieces shown to make sure the Ethernet and USB jacks are aligned with their respective holes on the housing wall.

  • To keep cement and fingerprints from getting on the outside of the panels, it is recommend that the paper backing for the Topside Adapter pieces be kept on until after cementing is finished.

  • Two pieces (with three sides each) will be cemented separately, then kept together using tape to allow access to the Topside Adapter later on.

  • Cement the three pieces shown. Be sure the long, skinny side panel is cemented with the flat side facing away from the side with the Ethernet and USB holes

  • Once the first set of three panels has been cemented, the other set of three can be put together.

  • Make sure the second set of pieces are assembled so that they mate with the first set.

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 74  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Tape can be used to keep the pieces from coming apart. Make sure the tape is towards one side so you can still see the lights in the middle of the board. Image 2/3: Tape can be used to keep the pieces from coming apart. Make sure the tape is towards one side so you can still see the lights in the middle of the board. Image 3/3: Tape can be used to keep the pieces from coming apart. Make sure the tape is towards one side so you can still see the lights in the middle of the board.

Edit Step 74  ¶ 

  • Now that the two side-panel assemblies have been cemented, the paper backing can be removed, and the pieces can be slid together.

  • Tape can be used to keep the pieces from coming apart. Make sure the tape is towards one side so you can still see the lights in the middle of the board.

Edit Step 75  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Start by stripping the ends of the twisted pair. Image 2/2: While holding the orange tab in the rear position, insert the bare copper of each of the tether wires into the green circular holes.

Edit Step 75  ¶ 

  • Attach the topside adapter to the other end of the tether.

  • Start by stripping the ends of the twisted pair.

  • While holding the orange tab in the rear position, insert the bare copper of each of the tether wires into the green circular holes.

  • Let go of the orange tab to secure the tether wires in place.

  • The order of the wires does not matter.

1 Edit Step 76  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Next, we'll glue the disks for the forward endcap. For this step, we're going to use a motor shaft as a centering pin. Image 2/3: Slide the larger forward endcap disk (28mm diameter) over the motor bell. Then slide the smaller one (24mm diameter) on. It will be a very tight fit. Image 3/3: Take another large forward endcap disk (28mm diameter) and sandwich the smaller 24mm diameter disk. Cement it in place.

1 Edit Step 76  ¶ 

  • If you have an ROV with a serial number less than 1400 then follow these steps. If you have an ROV that is 1400 or greater then move to the next step.

  • Next, we'll glue the disks for the forward endcap. For this step, we're going to use a motor shaft as a centering pin.

  • Slide the larger forward endcap disk (28mm diameter) over the motor bell. Then slide the smaller one (24mm diameter) on. It will be a very tight fit.

  • Take another large forward endcap disk (28mm diameter) and sandwich the smaller 24mm diameter disk. Cement it in place.

  • Attach and cement the outer forward battery endcap disk (the one that is has the two notches on the outside).

  • Visually inspect that the shaft going through the disks is perpendicular to them- although the fit is tight, it is still possible for the shaft to end up somewhat angulated

  • Sand a corner of the button terminal (any corner of the button terminal - on button side).

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 77  ¶ 

Image 1/3: We'll glue the disks for the forward endcap. For this step, we're going to use a motor shaft as a centering pin. Image 2/3: Start by sliding the outer forward battery endcap disk (the one that is has the two notches on the outside) onto the shaft. Image 3/3: Next slide on the smallest disk (also the thickest) onto the shaft and cement it in place.

Edit Step 77  ¶ 

  • If you have an ROV with a serial number that is 1400 or greater, then follow these steps. If you have an ROV that is less than 1400 skip this step as you assembled your front battery endcap in the previous step.

  • We'll glue the disks for the forward endcap. For this step, we're going to use a motor shaft as a centering pin.

  • Start by sliding the outer forward battery endcap disk (the one that is has the two notches on the outside) onto the shaft.

  • Next slide on the smallest disk (also the thickest) onto the shaft and cement it in place.

  • Finally, slide the forward endcap disk (28mm diameter) over the motor bell and cement it in place.

  • Visually inspect that the shaft going through the disks is perpendicular to them- although the fit is tight, it is still possible for the shaft to end up somewhat angulated

  • Sand a corner of the button terminal (any corner of the button terminal - on button side).

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 78  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Sand the bottom of the button terminal as well as the surface of the endcap that it will be bonded to. Image 2/3: Using superglue, fasten the button terminal to the forward endcap assembly (it should be against the circular endcap disk, not the flange disk that has nubs on it) Image 3/3: When gluing the button terminal to the acrylic only apply glue to two corners of the button terminal. This will allow the air to escape when being epoxied.

Edit Step 78  ¶ 

  • Using the same method as for the spring terminal, apply a glob of solder to the sanded area of the button terminal.

  • Sand the bottom of the button terminal as well as the surface of the endcap that it will be bonded to.

  • Using superglue, fasten the button terminal to the forward endcap assembly (it should be against the circular endcap disk, not the flange disk that has nubs on it)

  • When gluing the button terminal to the acrylic only apply glue to two corners of the button terminal. This will allow the air to escape when being epoxied.

  • Using a medium grit sandpaper sand the front edge of the endcap in order to add a chamfer. Make sure not to sand the grove where the o-ring will sit.

  • The next time you are using epoxy (you'll need to use it to attach the propellers to each motor bell, and to pot the outside cavities of the endcaps), you'll also want to fill the alignment hole on each battery endcap with epoxy.

  • When working with cyanoacrylate (super glue) it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

2 Edit Step 79  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Cut off three 8mm long pieces of the adhesive-lined shrink tubing that was also used on the motor leads. These will be used to keep the shaft concentric with the mounting hole in the propeller. Image 2/3: Slide one of the pieces of shrink tubing down to the root of each shaft and shrink it down until it is secure using a heat gun. Image 3/3: Slide one of the pieces of shrink tubing down to the root of each shaft and shrink it down until it is secure using a heat gun.

2 Edit Step 79  ¶ 

  • While the epoxy is still fluid, you'll want to attach propellers to the motor bells for each thuster. Start by sanding the shaft of each motor bell using a medium-grit (we used 150-grit) sand paper.

  • Cut off three 8mm long pieces of the adhesive-lined shrink tubing that was also used on the motor leads. These will be used to keep the shaft concentric with the mounting hole in the propeller.

  • Slide one of the pieces of shrink tubing down to the root of each shaft and shrink it down until it is secure using a heat gun.

Edit Step 80  ¶ 

Image 1/2: The first thing we'll pot is the two forward battery endcaps we just built.  To do this, simply place the nozzle of the epoxy cartridge into the top of the alignment hole and inject epoxy into the hole until you can see it spreading out across the bottom of the button terminal. Image 2/2: Sometimes enough of a seal is created around the button terminal that pressure will build up and push epoxy back out the alignment hole after it is injected in.  If this happens, use a small wire or toothpick to sort of 'plunge' the epoxy back and forth to fill the hole.

Edit Step 80  ¶ 

  • We'll now do our second set of potting

  • The first thing we'll pot is the two forward battery endcaps we just built. To do this, simply place the nozzle of the epoxy cartridge into the top of the alignment hole and inject epoxy into the hole until you can see it spreading out across the bottom of the button terminal.

  • Sometimes enough of a seal is created around the button terminal that pressure will build up and push epoxy back out the alignment hole after it is injected in. If this happens, use a small wire or toothpick to sort of 'plunge' the epoxy back and forth to fill the hole.

  • Next, we'll also fill the back side of the main endcaps around the protruding parts of the syringe sections.

  • Be careful not to allow epoxy to over-flow into the hole of the syringe as this will need to be clear for the syringe plunger (which acts as a pressure relief valve)

  • When working with epoxy it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

Edit Step 81  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Place the tip of the mixing nozzle firmly into the hole of a propeller and fill the hole with potting compound until it overflows. There may be some air that needs to escape for the potting to fully fill the hole. It's okay for some potting to overflow onto the surface above the hole. Image 2/3: In order to remove the trapped air, you can use a toothpick that you move up and down to get the air out and have the epoxy fill the entire cavity. Image 3/3: Using a rotating motion, press the propeller down against the motor shaft. You'll need to sort of screw the threading onto the shrink tubing on the shaft for it to go on all the way without scrunching the tubing.

Edit Step 81  ¶ 

  • The last thing we'll apply epoxy to is the propellers (which each get mounted onto a motor bell).

  • Place the tip of the mixing nozzle firmly into the hole of a propeller and fill the hole with potting compound until it overflows. There may be some air that needs to escape for the potting to fully fill the hole. It's okay for some potting to overflow onto the surface above the hole.

  • In order to remove the trapped air, you can use a toothpick that you move up and down to get the air out and have the epoxy fill the entire cavity.

  • Using a rotating motion, press the propeller down against the motor shaft. You'll need to sort of screw the threading onto the shrink tubing on the shaft for it to go on all the way without scrunching the tubing.

  • Do these steps for all three motor bells and place them somewhere where they can point directly upward. A wire shelf or a crack made between two books can allow the bottom side of the shaft to be out of the way.

  • If you have an ROV with a serial number of 1400 or greater, you will have three propellers that are all different.

3 Edit Step 82  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Add a chamfer to the front inside of the battery tubes. Using a medium grit sandpaper sand the inside edge. Image 2/3: Be very careful not to scratch the inside surface of the tube where the o-ring will seal against. Image 3/3: Attach the forward battery terminals to each battery pack. This will be done in a very similar way to how the rear spring terminals were wired.

3 Edit Step 82  ¶ 

  • Once the epoxy from the second potting phase has set, you can do the following steps:

  • Add a chamfer to the front inside of the battery tubes. Using a medium grit sandpaper sand the inside edge.

  • Be very careful not to scratch the inside surface of the tube where the o-ring will seal against.

  • Attach the forward battery terminals to each battery pack. This will be done in a very similar way to how the rear spring terminals were wired.

  • Using pliers (since the wire will likely get quite hot) hold the wire lead against the solder blob on the battery terminal and heat the terminal until it accepts the wire.

  • Hold the wire in place with the pliers until the solder cools and hardens.

  • This is a good point to trim off excess hot glue from around the main endcaps so that they engage with the main tube cleanly. Use pliers or a razor blade to remove any glue that will keep the inner surface of the endcap flange from mating with the edge of the main tube.

  • Also be sure that no hot glue has gotten into o-ring groove! If so, remove the hot glue very carefully to avoid nicking the plastic (which could create a leakage path)

Edit Step 83  ¶ 

Image 1/3: If you plan on using other batteries such as the Trustfire 26650 Li-Ion, you can skip this step. Image 2/3: If you plan on using the Batteryspace Li-FePO4, you will need to build a battery tube adapter.  The how-to on this is found [guide|21|HERE]. Image 3/3: If you plan on using the Batteryspace Li-FePO4, you will need to build a battery tube adapter.  The how-to on this is found [guide|21|HERE].

Edit Step 83  ¶ 

  • Now is a good time to talk about which batteries you plan on using for your OpenROV. We recommend the Batteryspace Li-FePO4, which are available on our webstore.

  • If you plan on using other batteries such as the Trustfire 26650 Li-Ion, you can skip this step.

  • If you plan on using the Batteryspace Li-FePO4, you will need to build a battery tube adapter. The how-to on this is found HERE.

4 Edit Step 84  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Place three fully-charged batteries in each tube, positive end forward. Image 2/3: Take the o-rings for the battery tubes and apply a small amount of lubrication to them. Then slide them over the front of the endcap. Image 3/3: This method will work for all ROVs but if your ROV has a serial number of 1400 or greater than it requires a little more force but it does work.

4 Edit Step 84  ¶ 

  • The two battery packs are wired in parallel to the OpenROV Controller Board.

  • Place three fully-charged batteries in each tube, positive end forward.

  • Take the o-rings for the battery tubes and apply a small amount of lubrication to them. Then slide them over the front of the endcap.

  • This method will work for all ROVs but if your ROV has a serial number of 1400 or greater than it requires a little more force but it does work.

  • Close the tube and secure it with an extra 157 O-ring.

  • Using a digital multimeter, measure the voltage across each battery tube at the DB-25 connector. You should have around 12 volts dc.

  • Make sure the polarity is correct! Refer to the DB-25 wiring diagram.

  • The batteries can be left in the battery tube safely and without being drained because the OpenROV is turned "on" by plugging the mini-USB cable into the Topside Adapter. (We will do that later).

1 Edit Step 85  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Do not let the motor snap into place: this can knock the rear ball bearing out causing the motor to not spin freely and the magnets to rub the internal electromagnets.  Instead, hold the propellor tightly as you slowly slide it in. Image 2/2: When attaching the motor bells make sure that they are not rubbing against any of the wires that are close to the motors.

1 Edit Step 85  ¶ 

  • You can also now attach the motor bells with propellers to their motors. You want the two aft props to be counter rotating. Make sure when attaching the motor bells that the inside magnets are free of debris for this can prevent the motor from spinning smoothly

  • Do not let the motor snap into place: this can knock the rear ball bearing out causing the motor to not spin freely and the magnets to rub the internal electromagnets. Instead, hold the propellor tightly as you slowly slide it in.

  • When attaching the motor bells make sure that they are not rubbing against any of the wires that are close to the motors.

  • If you have an ROV with a serial number less than 1400 then follow these steps. If you have an ROV that is 1400 or greater then move to the next step.

  • Your vertical propeller will be the one that you have left over. If it is not moving in the correct direction, you can reverse it in the cockpit settings under the "Diagnostic" panel.

Edit Step 86  ¶ 

Image 1/3: The vertical propeller is the one that has two blades. Because it is significantly more powerful than the horizontal propellers so it can come off meaning we need to add the c-clip that you removed earlier in order to keep the propeller on the motor. Image 2/3: Start by loosening the set screw on the vertical motor. Image 3/3: Pull the motor off from the base (this is why you installed the one that came off the easiest in this position).

Edit Step 86  ¶ 

  • If you have an ROV with a serial number that is 1400 or greater, then follow these steps. If you have an ROV that is less than 1400 skip these steps as you already attached your vertical propeller.

  • The vertical propeller is the one that has two blades. Because it is significantly more powerful than the horizontal propellers so it can come off meaning we need to add the c-clip that you removed earlier in order to keep the propeller on the motor.

  • Start by loosening the set screw on the vertical motor.

  • Pull the motor off from the base (this is why you installed the one that came off the easiest in this position).

  • Insert the motor bell with the propeller just like you did for the horizontal motors.

Edit Step 87  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Next insert the c-clip over the shaft of the motor and use pliers to bring it into place. Image 2/3: Next insert the c-clip over the shaft of the motor and use pliers to bring it into place. Image 3/3: Next insert the c-clip over the shaft of the motor and use pliers to bring it into place.

Edit Step 87  ¶ 

  • Take one of the c-clips that you saved and use needle-nose pliers to bend it back into the shape as shown in the first picture. You only need a c-clip on this one motor so you have three tries to get it correct.

  • Next insert the c-clip over the shaft of the motor and use pliers to bring it into place.

Edit Step 88  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:

Edit Step 88  ¶ 

  • Once the c-clip is in place, attach the motor back to the frame using the set screws on the base.

Edit Step 89  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Make sure the acrylic ring is concentric with the thrust guard and the inside ring is flush with the inside wall of the thrust guard. Image 2/3: Sand the bottom edges of the acrylic ring so that it fits into the ROV body. Image 3/3: Push the motor guard with acrylic ring into the top of the ROV for a snug fit.

Edit Step 89  ¶ 

  • Glue the remaining acrylic ring to the white thrust guard as shown.

  • Make sure the acrylic ring is concentric with the thrust guard and the inside ring is flush with the inside wall of the thrust guard.

  • Sand the bottom edges of the acrylic ring so that it fits into the ROV body.

  • Push the motor guard with acrylic ring into the top of the ROV for a snug fit.

  • Do not glue this assembly on to the ROV body, it is a pressure fit only.

  • When working with acrylic cement it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

  • If your vertical thruster doesn't fit with the white thrust guard on top of it, follow this post.

Edit Step 90  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Insert the DB-25 connector attached to the wire harness into the reciprocal connector on the Controller Board. You may have to wiggle it around a bit to fit under the USB plug for the webcam, but it should go in without needing to unplug anything. Image 2/3: Plug the one of the Ethernet patch cables that came in the Homeplug box into the Topside Adapter and into the Ethernet port on your laptop. Image 3/3: Plug the USB cable that came with your BeagleBone into your computer and get ready to plug the other end of the cable into the port on your Homeplug adapter.

Edit Step 90  ¶ 

  • You're now almost ready to do your first power-up on the ROV! Before doing the task above, fit the medium size (thick) black o-ring over the DB-25 and place into the groove on the endcap.

  • Insert the DB-25 connector attached to the wire harness into the reciprocal connector on the Controller Board. You may have to wiggle it around a bit to fit under the USB plug for the webcam, but it should go in without needing to unplug anything.

  • Plug the one of the Ethernet patch cables that came in the Homeplug box into the Topside Adapter and into the Ethernet port on your laptop.

  • Plug the USB cable that came with your BeagleBone into your computer and get ready to plug the other end of the cable into the port on your Homeplug adapter.

  • Connecting USB power to the Topside Adapter will cause the ROV to turn on. Since the ESCs may not be calibrated initially, it is a good idea to make sure the propellers on the ROV are clear, and that the camera platform can move smoothly if the servo moves.

  • Plug the USB cable into your topside adapter and look for lights on the Homeplug board in the Topside adapter to turn on. They should go through a startup sequence but then all be lit after several seconds (but the middle light may blink rapidly)

  • Look at the controller board and verify that the green "PWR" LED is on. You should also see one solid red LED and one blinking LED

Edit Step 91  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Scaling lasers create two parallel beams that are spaced 10cm apart so that the size of objects or their distance away can be estimated based on that known separation.  It's a lot like holding a ruler out in front of you!  We've waited to do this step until now because we'll need to be able to turn the lasers on to calibrate their distance. Image 2/3: Start by soldering the two laser diodes in parallel to an additional lead wire that is about 10cm in length.  You can use any 22awg or higher wire you have laying around.  Extra white 20awg wire from the motors and battery tubes can be used, but a few strands may need to be removed in order for it to fit into the header holes. Image 3/3: Once the wires are soldered together, shrink tubing should be placed over the solder joints.

Edit Step 91  ¶ 

  • Now that we've got the system up and running, we can attach the two scaling lasers.

  • Scaling lasers create two parallel beams that are spaced 10cm apart so that the size of objects or their distance away can be estimated based on that known separation. It's a lot like holding a ruler out in front of you! We've waited to do this step until now because we'll need to be able to turn the lasers on to calibrate their distance.

  • Start by soldering the two laser diodes in parallel to an additional lead wire that is about 10cm in length. You can use any 22awg or higher wire you have laying around. Extra white 20awg wire from the motors and battery tubes can be used, but a few strands may need to be removed in order for it to fit into the header holes.

  • Once the wires are soldered together, shrink tubing should be placed over the solder joints.

  • Ultimately, we'll plug the lasers into P2+ and P2- on the controller board, which will allow us to turn them on and off through software, but for now we'll just wire the lasers directly into 5v power. To do this, plug the ground wire into "GND" (either of the two) and the power wire into the pin labeled "+5v"

  • With the ROV turned on, the lasers should also turn on.

  • When soldering it is recommended that you wear safety glasses and have air circulation in the room you are working.

2 Edit Step 92  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Keep the ROV running so that you can assure that both lasers are shining.  You may need to focus the lasers to make a sharp dot by rotating the forward cylinder of the lasers. Image 2/3: Point the E-Chassis assembly toward the distant wall and clamp it to the table so that it is the same height off the ground as your piece of paper. Image 3/3: Take a dab of super glue and place it on the laser diode and then place it in the slot above the light. Hold it in place so the dot is lined up with your mark on the wall and wait for the glue to dry.

2 Edit Step 92  ¶ 

  • The first step to mounting the lasers is to find a wall about 3-5 meters away from your work surface. Take a piece of paper and put two marks on it that are 10 cm apart.

  • Keep the ROV running so that you can assure that both lasers are shining. You may need to focus the lasers to make a sharp dot by rotating the forward cylinder of the lasers.

  • Point the E-Chassis assembly toward the distant wall and clamp it to the table so that it is the same height off the ground as your piece of paper.

  • Take a dab of super glue and place it on the laser diode and then place it in the slot above the light. Hold it in place so the dot is lined up with your mark on the wall and wait for the glue to dry.

  • Make sure that the face of the laser diode doesn't protrude past the forward face of the camera platform, otherwise it may rub on the inside of the main tube when the E-chassis is inserted.

  • Now attach the second laser pointer in the same way, but this time make sure its dot is about 10cm to the appropriate side of the other laser. As simple as this step seems, you'll notice that the laser will want to drift left and right, up and down, and in and out without careful handling.

  • Once the lasers are in position then you can add more super glue in order to keep them in place.Once the lasers are aligned move the leads into there final position on the board of P2+ and P2-.

  • Make sure never to shine the lasers at a person, especially into their eyes. When working with cyanoacrylate (super glue) it is recommended that you wear gloves, safety glasses, and work in a ventilated area.

3 Edit Step 93  ¶ 

Image 1/2: For version 2.6 ROVs, the on-board software is already installed on the BeagleBone computer.  In previous versions, you would have needed to write the newest software image onto an SD card that would go into the BeagleBone, but in this case, your ROV should have everything it needs already installed onto its built in "eMMC" memory. Image 2/2: The ROV has a built in static IP address of 192.168.254.1, so to connect with it, your computer should have a similar address but with the last number set to something other then 1.  "192.168.254.2" for instance would work great.  The subnet mask should be set to 255.255.255.0.

3 Edit Step 93  ¶ 

  • This is where things start getting exciting! We're now going to try connecting to the ROV for the first time.

  • For version 2.6 ROVs, the on-board software is already installed on the BeagleBone computer. In previous versions, you would have needed to write the newest software image onto an SD card that would go into the BeagleBone, but in this case, your ROV should have everything it needs already installed onto its built in "eMMC" memory.

  • The ROV has a built in static IP address of 192.168.254.1, so to connect with it, your computer should have a similar address but with the last number set to something other then 1. "192.168.254.2" for instance would work great. The subnet mask should be set to 255.255.255.0.

  • Windows Vista: go to control panel -> network and sharing center -> click on "manage network connections" on the left-hand bar. Then r-click on "local area network" -> l-click on properties -> l-click on "Internet Protocol Version 4" -> l-click on "properties" and select the option "use the following ip address" and enter in 192.168.254.*

  • Windows 7: go to control panel > network and internet > network and sharing center > click on "change adapter settings" on the left-hand bar. Then r-click on "local area connection" > properties > l-click on "Internet Protocol Version 4" and click on properties. Select the option "use the following ip address" and enter in 192.168.254.*

  • Windows 8: go to control panel > network and internet > network and sharing center > click on "change adapter settings" on the left-hand bar. Then r-click on "Ethernet" > properties > l-click on "Internet Protocol Version 4" and click on properties. Select the option "use the following ip address" and enter in 192.168.254.*

  • Mac: go to System Preferences > then click on Network > then from the Location drop down menu select "Static IP" > then click on the ethernet on the left > for the Configure IPv4 drop down select "Manually" > then set the IP address to 192.168.254.*

1 Edit Step 94  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Other modern browsers such as Firefox work as well, but we strongly suggest using Chrome since it seems to work the best. Image 2/2: Before being able to log into the ROV, it will need to have time to boot up.  Wait at least 1 minute after turning the ROV on before trying to log on.

1 Edit Step 94  ¶ 

  • Open Google Chrome web-browser. If you do not have the latest version of Google Chrome, you can go here to get it. It's a free download.

  • Other modern browsers such as Firefox work as well, but we strongly suggest using Chrome since it seems to work the best.

  • Before being able to log into the ROV, it will need to have time to boot up. Wait at least 1 minute after turning the ROV on before trying to log on.

  • In the status bar at the top, type 192.168.254.1:8080, which is the IP address of the ROV. Press 'enter' and cross your fingers. Soon the OpenROV Cockpit should appear. It may take 10-20 seconds for the page to finish loading.

  • Although this photo shows values for current consumption, battery voltage, and other telemetry, those values will appear to be "0" until you've loaded firmware onto the Arduino on the Controller Board (which we'll show you how to do in the next step)

2 Edit Step 95  ¶ 

Image 1/3: With the OpenROV Cockpit open click the Settings button at top right Image 2/3: Click "Upload firmware from SD card to Arduino" Image 3/3: Click "Show details" in the upload arduino firmware window so you can see what is happening.

2 Edit Step 95  ¶ 

  • Now we'll update the software on the Controler Board (specifically, the Arduino chip on the Controller Board). This is a one time process unless you change your Arduino software and need to upload the latest version.

  • With the OpenROV Cockpit open click the Settings button at top right

  • Click "Upload firmware from SD card to Arduino"

  • Click "Show details" in the upload arduino firmware window so you can see what is happening.

  • Click "Apply new firmware" and wait for the process to finish. This may take around five minutes, and the progress bar may stop moving for minutes at a time. If it stops for longer then 10 minutes then click cancel and restart your ROV. It may be that the firmware loaded successfully, but if not, just try again.

3 Edit Step 96  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Plug in the USB cable to the topside adapter, while the batteries are in the ROV, so that the system is powered on. Image 2/2: Hold down (and continue holding down) the little red button next to the on/off switch of one of the ESCs while you switch the speed controller to the "on" position. You should hear a beeping sound coming from the respective motor. It will beep 14 times in a row. This means that it has entered programming mode.

3 Edit Step 96  ¶ 

  • Now we are going to program the Electric Speed Controllers (ESCs) to work in the right way for ROV operations. First locate the switches for the ESCs and turn them all off (away from the little red button). This will keep ESCs that you're not configuring from being affected by the changes you are making to the ESC you are configuring.

  • Plug in the USB cable to the topside adapter, while the batteries are in the ROV, so that the system is powered on.

  • Hold down (and continue holding down) the little red button next to the on/off switch of one of the ESCs while you switch the speed controller to the "on" position. You should hear a beeping sound coming from the respective motor. It will beep 14 times in a row. This means that it has entered programming mode.

  • There are 10 different settings that can be changed. Once you have entered programming mode (you heard 14 beeps), it then begins to count up from 1-10 corresponding to the the different item numbers on the list. When you reach the item number that you would like to change, release the red button that you have been holding down.

  • You will now hear a series of beeps (or a single beep) that corresponds to the value of the item number. This will repeat indefinitely. To change the value press and release the red button and this will advance the value by 1. You can only increase the number, so to decrease a value you will have to cycle through them all.

  • A value of 5 is indicated by a single long beep instead of five short beeps, so for example: A long beep + 2 short beeps “Beep---BeepBeep”) = "7"

  • Once the correct value is reached, switch the switch to the off position and this will save the value. Now repeat the above steps for the items that need to be changed on each ESC. For more information on programming the ESCs please refer to their manual

  • Item numbers 3,5,7,9, and 10 are already at their correct values by default, so you can skip those and only program items 1,2,4,6, and 8.

Edit Step 97  ¶ 

Image 1/2: With all of the ESCs switched off, go ahead and power up. Nothing should happen on the motors. Connect with the cockpit software and open the diagnostic pane. Image 2/2: Hold the reset button on the ESC while powering on the first ESC using the switch on the ESC... it should start beeping... let go of the reset button. (It will keep beeping which is fine).

Edit Step 97  ¶ 

  • Now that the speed controllers have been programmed we are going to calibrate them. As a reminder the order of the ESCs for the PWM wires are D6-Port, D7-Vertical, D8-Starboard.

  • With all of the ESCs switched off, go ahead and power up. Nothing should happen on the motors. Connect with the cockpit software and open the diagnostic pane.

  • Hold the reset button on the ESC while powering on the first ESC using the switch on the ESC... it should start beeping... let go of the reset button. (It will keep beeping which is fine).

  • Press reset once and you should hear a single beep.

  • Move that motor's slider all the way to the right (or click the "1") and then press the reset on the ESC again. You should get 2 beeps.

  • Move that motor's slider all the way to the left (or click the "-1") and then press the reset on the ESC again. After a few seconds the motor will begin to spin.

  • Switch off the ESC and move the slider back to the middle (or click the "0"). Move the next ESC and repeat...

Edit Step 98  ¶ 

Image 1/1:

Edit Step 98  ¶ 

  • At the time you can also focus your camera. The front silver part rotates and allows the focus to be changed.

1 Edit Step 99  ¶ 

Image 1/2: Make sure that you are gentle with this step so you do not scratch the edge of your electronics tube where the o-ring makes contact. Image 2/2: Remember this is an air-tight chamber, so once you push the bottom end-cap on, pull one of the plungers to let the compressed air escape.  Also, since the electronics give off heat, wait for a few minutes because the air inside will warm up, expand, and push the endcap off again.  Just push it back on at this point and pull the plunger again.

1 Edit Step 99  ¶ 

  • With the DB-25 plugged into the E-chassis and the ROV turned on, slide the main tube down over the E-Chassis- making sure to keep wires from getting pinched against the tube as you go.

  • Make sure that you are gentle with this step so you do not scratch the edge of your electronics tube where the o-ring makes contact.

  • Remember this is an air-tight chamber, so once you push the bottom end-cap on, pull one of the plungers to let the compressed air escape. Also, since the electronics give off heat, wait for a few minutes because the air inside will warm up, expand, and push the endcap off again. Just push it back on at this point and pull the plunger again.

  • Make sure that the switches on the ESCs are all in the "on" position.

  • Make sure the light wires are in their grooves and are not pressed against the electronics tube as this will cause the camera platform to have problems moving up and down.

  • The reason it's good to have the ROV turned on while inserting the E-chassis, is that you can make sure nothing gets accidentally unplugged as the main tube is being seated.

Edit Step 100  ¶ 

Image 1/3: Once the electronics tube is closed, you can secure it to the ROV using two of the 157 O-Rings (which are the longest ones--the same ones used to hold the battery tubes closed).  They clip into the braces that are part of the clear acrylic internal structure as shown. Image 2/3: Orient the endcaps so that the flat end of the endcaps is facing downwards, against the battery tubes. Image 3/3: Orient the endcaps so that the flat end of the endcaps is facing downwards, against the battery tubes.

Edit Step 100  ¶ 

  • Use the O-ring to hold the electronics tube in place.

  • Once the electronics tube is closed, you can secure it to the ROV using two of the 157 O-Rings (which are the longest ones--the same ones used to hold the battery tubes closed). They clip into the braces that are part of the clear acrylic internal structure as shown.

  • Orient the endcaps so that the flat end of the endcaps is facing downwards, against the battery tubes.

Edit Step 101 How to assemble the IMU/Depth Sensor Module  ¶ 

Image 1/1: [guide|4|Go to the Guide 'How to assemble the IMU/Depth Sensor.]

Edit Step 101 How to assemble the IMU/Depth Sensor Module  ¶ 

Edit Step 102  ¶ 

Image 1/1: By default the ROV will be between 150 and 200 grams light in water. We'll post a link for how to properly ballast your ROV soon, but in the mean time, just place the ROV in some water (like a pool, bathtub, or sink) and add heavy things to the cross bars until it neither sinks or floats, but just stays at the depth you put it at.

Edit Step 102  ¶ 

  • Okay... you may not belive this, but you're basically ready to use your ROV! If you hover over the keyboard icon in the upper left hand corner of the heads up display there will be instruction on how to drive the ROV. Before you take the ROV out in the water, you'll need to ballast it so that it is neutrally buoyant.

  • By default the ROV will be between 150 and 200 grams light in water. We'll post a link for how to properly ballast your ROV soon, but in the mean time, just place the ROV in some water (like a pool, bathtub, or sink) and add heavy things to the cross bars until it neither sinks or floats, but just stays at the depth you put it at.

  • The ROV also tends to be a bit back heavy, so you'll probably want most of your ballistic weight to be positioned fairly far forward (like on the forward crossbar).

Edit Step 103 First time in the water  ¶ 

Image 1/1: Pull the motor bells off and apply liberal amounts of silicone (spray) to inside the motors and inside the bells.  Even fresh tap water can cause rust otherwise.

Edit Step 103 First time in the water  ¶ 

  • Turn on the OpenROV and let it sit for ~10 minutes so the air inside the electronics tube warms up. Pull on the plungers to release any resulting pressure, and then double check that the battery and electronic tube endcaps are still fully inserted.

  • Pull the motor bells off and apply liberal amounts of silicone (spray) to inside the motors and inside the bells. Even fresh tap water can cause rust otherwise.

  • Fill a bathtub with cold water (or try to match Mother Nature's temperature where you will "typically" dive for an accurate test), and while watching the video from the OpenROV, dunk it under water, hold it there, and watch for air bubbles coming up. If you see bubbles, or if the video stops responding, pull it out and find and fix the leaks!

  • Try driving. If you find left is right and forwards is backwards, swap the starboard and port propellers.

  • Take the OpenROV out, pull the motor bells off, and confirm there are no friction burns on any nearby wires. If so, fasten those wires away from the motors with tie wraps.

  • With all power off, try spinning the 3 motors with your fingers. If any of them don't spin as easily as the rest, pull the bell off and try to clean out any obstructions.

  • Consider buying some hollow-core polypropylene rope, and affix it to the tether so that it will float.

You're Done!

49 Comments

Step 33 sanding the plastic with dremel tool for port and starboard motor shrouds should come earlier if possible. It makes a lot of mess so it would be nice to be able to wipe down the ROV without motors, wires, etc attached.

Matthew Valancy - Reply

I actually don't know where to place it, but I had to adjust my camera lens. (I just realized the adjustable lens when I was browsing Amazon for a replacement...)

Maybe before we mount the cam, as i can't move the lens when the cam is mounted.

gloeru - Reply

it is to complex.

bryan23393 - Reply

examine solderjoint and be sure to use the water proof shrink wrap I suggest you user some clear windshileld silicone cement THEN put the blue shrink wrap over the whole stack of 8 wires. This should give a very good waterproof seal between the solder joint and the point at which the joint buts write up to the enamal on the rotor.

Steve Bassett - Reply

At some point after this step I noticed one of the bearings to my motor had fallen out. Use caution when putting the motor bell back on to make sure the bearing doesnt come out. The added heat in this step might have made it easier for the bearing to come out.

Jimmy - Reply

Better to apply the glue to the metal of the terminal than to the plastic before pressing together.

Tim Mundon - Reply

I had tolerance issues on the main end-caps. I got two replacement as promised from OpenROV which was cool. Unfortunately, they had tolerance issues as well. I wrapped the end-cap in Teflon tape and now the seal is awesome. I have not yet tested it in the water, but I suspect it may be a good solution to ensure a good seal. Please let me know if anyone has tried anything similar, and the result.

Adam Kahnke - Reply

As a suggestion, perhaps do not start the step by saying 'use super glue' then later suggest that velcro may be an option... Say to use super glue OR velcro.

Tim Mundon - Reply

Thanks for the tip.. I removed the note about the velcro. (Actually, I'm not sure who edited that in, but I'm unsure it would work well anyway since I think it would push the LED panel too high off the camera platform so that it would collide with the main tube).

Eric Stackpole -

I tried the velcro first (figuring that it could be swapped out) and found that the addition made the LED lights too high to allow the tub to slip over everything. I had to peel it off and glue the lights in the end. So removing the velcro idea is best.

Carl Lipo - Reply

This step states: "At this point, you can also plug the ESC servo leads into the 3x6 header labeled "J8". You'll want ESC 1 (Port) to be wired to D6, ESC 2 (Vertical) to be wired to D7 and ESC 3 (Starboard) to be wired to D8" Its not clear here which board has the J8 header. Its not shown in the photos and there doesnt appear to be anything like this on the Controller board.

Carl Lipo - Reply

Thanks for the feedback, we've added a step with a picture and correct designation.

Zack - Reply

Is servo horn upside down in this image? In the next step (53) the first photo shows the servo cable and sticker oriented towards the hole in the controller plate. If you have the horn shown as in the diagram (step 52), the servo wire would come out towards the far edge. I think the servo horn would also not be in alignment with the center axis if you follow the image in step 52. Or I could be wrong.

Carl Lipo - Reply

Just updated this to reflect correct orientation.

Zack - Reply

It may be worth upgrading the servo to one with metal gears. During the first times I booted up (prior to updating the code [ which should be required as a step in the build process ]), I ended up stripping the gears on the HS-81 servo. I replaced it with an Hitec HS-82MG and that's working just fine. I'm sure other brands will work -- the size of the appropriate servo is "micro" (versus sub-micro or other sizes).

Carl Lipo - Reply

I ended up shortening the USB cable on the camera to 20 cm (cutting @ 5cm from camera and then adding 15cm to the USB plug. Shortening the cable simplified overall cable management quite a bit. The usb cable consists of 4 color coded wire surrounded by a foil wrapping. Use a hobby knife to cut the black plastic housing away from the foil and peel the foil back to expose the wires. Solder the wires with the same colors on each side (red, green, black and white). I used shrink tube to protect the connections and then wrapped it up with the foil. I put a larger shrink tube over all of it.

Carl Lipo - Reply

Did the same shortening, much easier to manage cable afterwards. I'll get back with a report if it actually works...... ;)

Richard Soderberg -

The black screw that can be seen on the second picture in this step - when is it installed? Is it installed in step 56? Can this be made alittle more clear in this step. I cannot see this being installed in the video (video 6). Ive tried the black screw that sits in the servo - but it is too short. Is there another black screw I should use?

Endre - Reply

In step 60 the wire harness has to be cut at 17 cm measured from the end cap. In step 30 the wires are to be labelled. That instruction should include the position of the labels, i.e. within these 17 cm.

Rob van Ree - Reply

This was a tough decision to make when we were writing the instructions. Since it's pretty hard to know where the right place for a label will be until after routing the wire, I figured it would be easier for people to just label each wire at its end, and then ad labels again after going through the endcap. This way, labeling can be done quickly without exact measurement needed.

Eric Stackpole - Reply

Its not clear whether the I2C wires mentioned here are 4 out of the 6 extra wires or something else. The instructions make it seem like one picks 4 wires randomly out of the 6 we have extra. I would think that labeling would have helped -- i.e., labeling the +3, grnd, SCL, SDA -- so that they can be connected easily. But I suppose one can find them by measuring pin to wire with an ohmmeter.

Carl Lipo - Reply

The last image of this step said that there are ESC_1A, B and C, and also the ESC_2 and 3. But it didn't say which wire is A, B or C. Which the wires were pointed as A,B or C?

Anthony Mak - Reply

I had the same question. It looks like the order doesn't matter. http://openrov.com/forum/topics/esc-labe...

Jimmy -

A = Red, B = Blue, C = Black

Udomsak -

I had the same question ;-)

Camille Pinto - Reply

I simply assembled everything, secured it with rubber bands and applied my (very fluid) cement from the outside. Worked very well! But keep in mind that access to the adapter will be difficult :o)

Jochen Reinhard - Reply

Maybe add another picture on the motor bell to show that there are 4 pieces that need to be glued together i did unfortunately glue only 3 together :(

Nils Jakobi - Reply

What E-90 fluid? I don't see this step referenced anywhere else.

Carl Lipo - Reply

E-90 was a type of epoxy that we used in the past. We've updated it to just say "epoxy".

Thanks!

Zack - Reply

In the YouTube video, this step would have already been completed (right?)

Carl Lipo - Reply

You mention hot glue, but its not clear where this would have been applied.

Tim Mundon - Reply

Step 38 shows the hot glue being applied that is mentioned for trimming in Step 73.

Matthew Valancy -

Add two of the small o-rings to the battery end caps. Worthwhile applying some lubrication to them to enable a better fit & seal of the tube.

Tim Mundon - Reply

The battery tubes that i received had a small lip on the inside of the tubes. This needs to be very carefully trimmed off using a sharp blade, or the endcap will not fit. I created a very small bevel (only 0.5mm or so) on the inside of the tube so as not to affect the sealing. You need to be very careful in this step. This allowed a much easier fit of the end caps.

Tim Mundon - Reply

Tim, Thanks for the suggestion. I had the same problem and I chamfered the inside edge with a razor to finally get my battery endcaps installed.

Jimmy -

LiFepo batteries will be closer to 10v than 12v.

Miguel Angel - Reply

You have already attached the motor bells to the motors in an earlier step (71)

Tim Mundon - Reply

During this step one of my laser has gone dim. The other one is still full brightness, but the second one is making light but it is very dim. I checked and it's reading 5v across the dim laser, so don't think a power or wiring issue. Has my laser diode gone bad?

Brett Harrison - Reply

Yeah, looks like a bad laser. Send an email to support@openrov.com and let them know. Otherwise you can probably find a laser diode for around 3 $ on Jameco.

Zack -

I assume at some point here you need to copy the Software onto the SD card and insert into the BB?

Tim Mundon - Reply

I'm assuming this as well as I just started building my v2.6. I started out reading the v2.5 instructions before I realized that v2.6 instructions were posted. Not a bad idea to read both, since some stuff (like the 2GB SD card instruction and link to software downloads in v2.5 step 84) were left out of the v2.6 instruction set.

Richard Ewing - Reply

We're trying to make it so the v2.6 instructions have all the information you need, so please let us know if there are specific things you find that we still need to add. For v2.6, the software for the BeagleBone is pre-loaded onto the on-board memory of the board, so you don't need to download any software and you don't need an SD card!

Eric

Eric Stackpole -

What if you only see the camera feed in the cockpit? Our top, bottom, and side bars are all missing and we tried a few browsers. Could it be that the screen isn't wide enough?

Danny Epperson - Reply

Is this firmware (for the Arduino chip on the controller board) different from the the BeagleBone image that's being updated in Step 68? I'm also confused why it says "... from SD card" (I didn't attach an SD card to it)... nevertheless the firmware updated successfully for me on the first try!

Or is perhaps that I must first update the BeagleBone (from https://github.com/OpenROV/openrov-softw...) and this somehow embed the firmware "from SD card" that's pushed to the controller board?

Michael McCandless - Reply

Yes, to respond to the comment, the firmware on the Arduino is different from the image on the BeagleBone.

The "load image from SD card" is an artifact from an earlier release. Both the image and the firmware used to be on the SD cards but now the firmware and the image are both in the memory of the BBB.

Updating the firmware is done through the cockpit. Updating the image is done via the instructions on the github.

Zack - Reply

The only way I was able to program the ESCs was to first disconnect their J8 header plugs.

Then power up the ROV with the batteries with the tether on, and proceed to program the ESCs one by one as instructed.

Marco Rubinstein - Reply

Which program is better?

Camille Pinto - Reply

The ones that are in bold are the ones that should be changed to match the recommended settings.

OpenROV -

At this point you can cut the syringe plungers and insert into the cut-off syringes that are in the centers of the end caps.

Tim Mundon - Reply